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The birth of the universe = Te Whanautanga o te ao tukupu : Maori oral cosmogony from the Wairarapa / Agathe Thornton.

By: Thornton, Agathe.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, N.Z. : Reed Pub., 2004Description: 288 pages, [4] pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 079000948X (hbk.).Other title: Whanautanga o te ao tukupu.Subject(s): Cosmogony, Maori -- New Zealand -- South Wairarapa District | Cosmogony, Maori -- New Zealand -- Masterton District | Cosmogony, Maori -- New Zealand -- Carterton District | Legends, Maori | Maori (New Zealand people) -- Religion | Maori (New Zealand people) -- Folklore | Ranginui | Papatūānuku | Tānemāhuta | Tohunga | AtuaDDC classification: z523.12
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Te Taurawhiri Non-Fiction Alexander Library | Te Rerenga Mai o Te Kauru
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Te Taurawhiri Non-Fiction Alexander Library | Te Rerenga Mai o Te Kauru
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Why did the Maori, of the Wairarapa in particular, come to write down their oral traditions? How did they do it? And what was changed, or lost, in the translation from oral to literal? These are the questions Professor Agathe Thornton examines in relation to oral traditions of the Wairarapa, and the stories she chooses to compare are major parts of the areas's cosmogony (Cosmogony is the story of how the cosmos came into existence). Of great importance are the dictation of stories from the heavenly world; the Separation of Rangi and Papa, and the ascent of Tane to Io for the Sacred Stones. In the Wairarapa, stories of the heavenly world were recited by three tohunga; Te Matorohanga, Pohuhu and Te Okawhare. Professor Thornton's conclusions provide insight into the way in which the tohunga shaped his narrative performance, as well as commenting on cosmogony stories of greater Polynesia and the relevance of Maori oral traditions in the present day."

"Ngā kete e toru = 3 baskets of knowledge"

Includes bibliographical references (p. 275-280) and index.

In English with some Maori texts of manuscripts, and their translation into English.

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