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The Battle of Midway / Craig L. Symonds.

By: Symonds, Craig L.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Pivotal moments in American history: Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2011Description: xii, 452 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780195397932 (acid-free paper).Subject(s): Midway, Battle of, 1942 | World War, 1939-1945 -- Naval operations, American | World War, 1939-1945 -- Naval operations, JapaneseDDC classification: 940.54/26699
Contents:
CinCPac -- The Kidåo butai -- The brownshoe navy -- American counterstrike -- Seeking the decisive battle -- Pete and Jimmy -- The codebreakers -- The Battle of the Coral Sea -- The eve of battle -- Opening act -- Nagumo's dilemma (4:00 A.M. to 8:30 A.M.) -- The flight to nowhere (7:00 A.M. to 11:20 A.M.) -- Attack of the torpedo squadrons (8:30 A.M. to 10:20 A.M.) -- The tipping point (7:00 A.M. to 10:30 A.M.) -- The Japanese counterstrike (11:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M.) -- Dâenouement -- Epilogue -- Appendix A: American and Japanese aircraft carriers -- Appendix B: American and Japanese aircraft -- Appendix C: American order of battle -- Appendix D: Japanese order of battle -- Appendix E: How much did the U.S. know of Japanese plans? -- Appendix F: The flight to nowhere.
CinCPac -- The Kidō butai -- The brownshoe navy -- American counterstrike -- Seeking the decisive battle -- Pete and Jimmy -- The codebreakers -- The Battle of the Coral Sea -- The eve of battle -- Opening act -- Nagumo's dilemma (4:00 A.M. to 8:30 A.M.) -- The flight to nowhere (7:00 A.M. to 11:20 A.M.) -- Attack of the torpedo squadrons (8:30 A.M. to 10:20 A.M.) -- The tipping point (7:00 A.M. to 10:30 A.M.) -- The Japanese counterstrike (11:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M.) -- Dénouement -- Epilogue -- Appendix A: American and Japanese aircraft carriers -- Appendix B: American and Japanese aircraft -- Appendix C: American order of battle -- Appendix D: Japanese order of battle -- Appendix E: How much did the U.S. know of Japanese plans? -- Appendix F: The flight to nowhere.
Summary: A close-up look at the battle of Midway Island analyzes this crucial naval victory, which marked the turning point for the American fleet in the Pacific theater of World War II.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

There are few moments in American history in which the course of events tipped so suddenly and so dramatically as at the Battle of Midway. At dawn of June 4, 1942, a rampaging Japanese navy ruled the Pacific. By sunset, their vaunted carrier force (the Kido Butai) had been sunk and their gripon the Pacific had been loosened forever.In this absolutely riveting account of a key moment in the history of World War II, one of America's leading naval historians, Craig L. Symonds paints an unforgettable portrait of ingenuity, courage, and sacrifice. Symonds begins with the arrival of Admiral Chester A. Nimitz at Pearl Harbor afterthe devastating Japanese attack, and describes the key events leading to the climactic battle, including both Coral Sea - the first battle in history against opposing carrier forces - and Jimmy Doolittle's daring raid of Tokyo. He focuses throughout on the people involved, offering telling portraitsof Admirals Nimitz, Halsey, Spruance and numerous other Americans, as well as the leading Japanese figures, including the poker-loving Admiral Yamamoto. Indeed, Symonds sheds much light on the aspects of Japanese culture - such as their single-minded devotion to combat, which led to poorly armoredplanes and inadequate fire-safety measures on their ships - that contributed to their defeat. The author's account of the battle itself is masterful, weaving together the many disparate threads of attack - attacks which failed in the early going - that ultimately created a five-minute window inwhich three of the four Japanese carriers were mortally wounded, changing the course of the Pacific war in an eye-blink.Symonds is the first historian to argue that the victory at Midway was not simply a matter of luck, pointing out that Nimitz had equal forces, superior intelligence, and the element of surprise. Nimitz had a strong hand, Symonds concludes, and he rightly expected to win.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

CinCPac -- The Kidåo butai -- The brownshoe navy -- American counterstrike -- Seeking the decisive battle -- Pete and Jimmy -- The codebreakers -- The Battle of the Coral Sea -- The eve of battle -- Opening act -- Nagumo's dilemma (4:00 A.M. to 8:30 A.M.) -- The flight to nowhere (7:00 A.M. to 11:20 A.M.) -- Attack of the torpedo squadrons (8:30 A.M. to 10:20 A.M.) -- The tipping point (7:00 A.M. to 10:30 A.M.) -- The Japanese counterstrike (11:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M.) -- Dâenouement -- Epilogue -- Appendix A: American and Japanese aircraft carriers -- Appendix B: American and Japanese aircraft -- Appendix C: American order of battle -- Appendix D: Japanese order of battle -- Appendix E: How much did the U.S. know of Japanese plans? -- Appendix F: The flight to nowhere.

CinCPac -- The Kidō butai -- The brownshoe navy -- American counterstrike -- Seeking the decisive battle -- Pete and Jimmy -- The codebreakers -- The Battle of the Coral Sea -- The eve of battle -- Opening act -- Nagumo's dilemma (4:00 A.M. to 8:30 A.M.) -- The flight to nowhere (7:00 A.M. to 11:20 A.M.) -- Attack of the torpedo squadrons (8:30 A.M. to 10:20 A.M.) -- The tipping point (7:00 A.M. to 10:30 A.M.) -- The Japanese counterstrike (11:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M.) -- Dénouement -- Epilogue -- Appendix A: American and Japanese aircraft carriers -- Appendix B: American and Japanese aircraft -- Appendix C: American order of battle -- Appendix D: Japanese order of battle -- Appendix E: How much did the U.S. know of Japanese plans? -- Appendix F: The flight to nowhere.

A close-up look at the battle of Midway Island analyzes this crucial naval victory, which marked the turning point for the American fleet in the Pacific theater of World War II.

11 135 151

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Maps (p. ix)
  • Editors Note (p. xi)
  • Introduction (p. 3)
  • 1 CinCPac (p. 6)
  • 2 TheKidM Butai (p. 25)
  • 3 The Brown Shoe Navy (p. 44)
  • 4 American Counterstrike (p. 64)
  • 5 Seeking the Decisive Battle (p. 88)
  • 6 Pete and Jimmy (p. 111)
  • 7 The Code Breakers (p. 133)
  • 8 The Battle of the Coral Sea (p. 152)
  • 9 The Eve of Battle (p. 176)
  • 10 Opening Act (p. 198)
  • 11 Nagumo's Dilemma (4:00 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.) (p. 218)
  • 12 The Flight to Nowhere (7:00a.m. to 11:20a.m.) (p. 245)
  • 13 Attack of the Torpedo Squadrons (8:30 a.m. to 10:20 a.m.) (p. 266)
  • 14 The Tipping Point (7:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.) (p. 288)
  • 15 The Japanese Counterstrike (ll:00a.m.to6:00p.m.) (p. 309)
  • 16 Denouement (p. 337)
  • Epilogue (p. 357)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 367)
  • Appendix A American and Japanese Aircraft Carriers (p. 369)
  • Appendix B American and Japanese Aircraft (p. 373)
  • Appendix C American Order of Battle at Midway (p. 375)
  • Appendix D Japanese Order of Battle at Midway (p. 379)
  • Appendix E How Much Did the U.S. Know of Japanese Plans? (p. 387)
  • Appendix F The Flight to Nowhere (p. 389)
  • Notes (p. 393)
  • A Note on Sources (p. 429)
  • Bibliography (p. 435)
  • Index (p. 443)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

History's second aircraft carrier battle certainly deserves a place in this "Pivotal Moments" series. Through expert analysis of the details behind the battle, Symonds (history, emeritus, U.S. Naval Academy; Decision at Sea) illuminates American commanders' errors that could have lost the battle, and which were later downplayed. Japanese overconfidence and American cryptographic intelligence and luck proved decisive. VERDICT Well documented through interviews, official records, and secondary sources, the book will show readers that Midway was, as Wellington would have said, "a close-run thing." General military history enthusiasts will be fascinated, and specialists will revel in the careful dissection of the action. (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

No series on turning points in American history could omit the Battle of Midway, which undoubtedly shortened WWII and may have made possible the unconditional surrender of Japan. The events of the campaign and the lead-up to it are familiar to a wide range of readers, but Symonds reprises them with skill in the writing, research, and organization. The general thrust of the book is that the Japanese lost the battle rather than the Americans winning it, with the Combined Fleet throwing away its overwhelming numerical superiority and grossly underestimating the potential of American cryptanalysis. The author also goes further than some volumes into warts and all portraits Frank Jack Fletcher emerges as a more insightful commander than the frequently idolized Spruance and Marc Mitscher. A good place to start on Midway for any naval collection not overflowing on the battle.--Green, Roland Copyright 2010 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

A wholly satisfying history of America's most satisfying naval victory, won in June 1942 with vastly inferior forces.Symonds (History Emeritus/U.S. Naval Academy; The Civil War at Sea, 2009, etc.) writes that America's overwhelming industrial superiority doomed Japan, but adds that this was nowhere in evidence following Pearl Harbor, when its immense fleet with 10 aircraft carriers dwarfed the United States' four. By April, Japan had performed so well that leaders debated what to do next. The winner was charismatic Admiral Yamamoto, whose victory at Pearl Harbor gave him unprecedented authority. He proposed attacking tiny Midway Island, 1,200 miles west of Hawaii, claiming that this would draw American carriers to its defense, and their destruction would force a negotiated peace. Yamamoto's superiors opposed the plan but caved in. Thanks to American code breakers, U.S. forces knew Japanese intentionsuseful information although not as vital as some historians claim. Approaching Midway, each fleet searched for and located the other almost simultaneously. In the subsequent action, both sides experienced the confusion, blunders and blind chance that invariably accompanies battles. Better luck and fewer blunders favored the U.S., which sank four Japanese carriers.Essentially a history of the Pacific war from January to June 1942 (Midway does not enter the picture until 100 pages in), this is a lucid, intensely researched, mildly revisionist account of a significant moment in American military history.]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.