Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

How many letters are in goodbye? / Yvonne Cassidy.

By: Cassidy, Yvonne, 1974- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Dublin : Hachette Books Ireland, 2014Description: 401 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781444744156 (paperback); 1444744151 (paperback).Subject(s): People with disabilities -- Fiction | Homeless persons -- Fiction | Mothers and daughters -- Fiction | Family secrets -- Fiction | Letters -- Fiction | Grief -- Fiction | New York (N.Y.) -- FictionGenre/Form: General fiction.DDC classification: CAS Summary: Nineteen year old Rhea Farrell carries the scars of a childhood accident where she lost her arm. But Rhea also carries scars that aren't so visible - the death of a mother she hardly remembers and the impact of her father's drinking. When Rhea finds herself alone and homeless on the streets of New York she turns to the person she always wished she could turn to - her mother. And just like she used to do as a little girl, she starts to write her letters - to tell her the things she can't tell anyone else, to share her fears, to ask for help. Rhea's journey brings her deeper into her mother's past where she uncovers some buried family secrets. And as she finds out more about the woman her mother truly was, Rhea discovers too, just what kind of woman she wants to be. And that sometimes it takes longer than you think to say goodbye...
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection CAS 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

It's been almost eleven years since Rhea Farrell last wrote to her mother.
It was a Friday night ritual - until Rhea's father decided it was stupid to write letters to a dead person. That was the summer before the accident. The summer before Rhea began to keep her first secret.
Now about to turn eighteen, Rhea finds herself alone on the streets of New York with nobody to talk to about the future, or the past. So, just like she used to do as a little girl, she begins a letter with the words 'Dear Mum' and tells her mother the things she can't tell anyone else.
In the city where Allison Farrell was born, her daughter begins to delve into her past. And as she uncovers more about who her mother truly was, Rhea starts to figure out exactly who she herself wants to be. And that sometimes it takes longer than you think to say goodbye...

"What if uncovering the past led to a future you never imagined?" --Cover.

Nineteen year old Rhea Farrell carries the scars of a childhood accident where she lost her arm. But Rhea also carries scars that aren't so visible - the death of a mother she hardly remembers and the impact of her father's drinking. When Rhea finds herself alone and homeless on the streets of New York she turns to the person she always wished she could turn to - her mother. And just like she used to do as a little girl, she starts to write her letters - to tell her the things she can't tell anyone else, to share her fears, to ask for help. Rhea's journey brings her deeper into her mother's past where she uncovers some buried family secrets. And as she finds out more about the woman her mother truly was, Rhea discovers too, just what kind of woman she wants to be. And that sometimes it takes longer than you think to say goodbye...

6 7 8 11 18 22 25 27 37 62 76 96 103 151 155 172 174

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

Open publication
Excerpted from How Many Letters Are in Goodbye? by Yvonne Cassidy All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-Cassidy's epistolary novel skillfully explores the trauma of family tragedy against the backdrop of New York City in 1999. As her 18th birthday approaches, Rhea wrestles with experiences of homelessness and confronting the tragedies in her family's past by writing a series of letters to the mother she lost when she was only three. After running away from her aunt's home to survive in the city she had obsessed over as a child, Rhea is given the opportunity to work at a seaside summer camp for homeless youth. At camp Rhea begins to heal from the pain of her mother's death and her father's alcoholism and learns to accept herself and her sexuality. Rhea's undeliverable letters provide insight into her past and present, progressively revealing the tragedies of her past interwoven with the stark realities of her life on the street. Rhea's frustration over being perceived as disabled due to the childhood incident in which she lost her arm feels authentic, even as her denial of family history sometimes borders on naïveté. The individuals whom Rhea encounters are appropriately portrayed with varied degrees of complexity, shaking Rhea's assumptions about the appearances of lesbians, people who eat in soup kitchens, and alcoholism. References to sexual abuse and spare descriptions of sexual experiences make this work appropriate for mature teens. A heartbreaking story about the challenges of trusting, healing, and saying goodbye. VERDICT An additional purchase; give this title to readers looking for emotional impact.-Amanda Foulk, Sacramento Public Library © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

From Ireland, where her American mother and Irish father met in a pub, and later to Coral Springs, Florida, and the streets of New York City, Rhea's life is detailed through her letters to her dead mother. Life is harsh for the 17-year-old. She lost her arm in an accident as a young girl, endured the loss of her mother under questionable circumstances, survived her father's drinking, and questions her own sexuality. Irish author Cassidy does not sugarcoat the journey that takes Rhea to Florida to live with her aunt Ruth and cousin Laurie and then back up to New York to search for her mother's identity. Meeting up with Sergei, another searching soul on the streets, gives her something of a safe harbor for a while. Readers will root for Rhea to move forward as she grapples with the realities of her mother's hidden and abusive past. Through the letters, Cassidy develops Rhea's resolve and resiliency as she learns to accept both her family and her lineage. An effective story delivered via a unique structure.--Bush, Gail Copyright 2016 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Teenage immigrant Rhea Farrell must figure out how to confront fear and loss in 1999 New York City. In a series of letters to her mum, Rhea details her new life in America, far from Ireland, where her father was buried and her mother's body remains, unfound. Rhea feels free in New York, away from overbearing Aunt Ruth in Coral Springs, Florida. Surviving the streets of the big city seems feasible with the aid of charismatic Sergei, until money and Sergei's charms run low. Every day someone denies her a job, staring at what's left of her right arm while offering a thin excuse. At this rate, Rhea knows she cannot move forward, but she cannot go back to the loose ends in Coral Springs. A meeting one night alters Rhea's course and teaches her that running away is not a proper goodbye. Cassidy anchors readers in Rhea's kaleidoscope of emotions, writing a narrative that's at times dizzying from the intensity of Rhea's mood changes and at others frustrating due to her stubbornness. It's a rough emotional landscape, demanding readers with a high tolerance for angst, but the limited point of view pays off eventually. Rhea's journey does not always offer thrills, but Cassidy's consistent momentum moves her forward to where she needs to go. Heavy and intense, this book will make readers confront their own senses of identity. (Historical fiction. 14 up) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.