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The Auckland University Press anthology of New Zealand literature / edited by Jane Stafford and Mark Williams.

Contributor(s): Stafford, Jane, 1951- | Williams, Mark, 1951- | Williams, Mark, 1951- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, N.Z. : Auckland University Press, 2012Description: 1162 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781869405892 (hbk) :; 9781869405892; 1869405897.Other title: Anthology of New Zealand literature.Subject(s): New Zealand literature | New Zealand literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism | New Zealand literature -- 21st century -- History and criticism | New Zealand -- Literary collectionsDDC classification: NZ820.8
Partial contents:
Contact -- Colonial -- Maoriland -- Between the wars -- Cultural nationalism -- Fretful sleepers : after the war -- From kiwi culture to counter-culture -- Earthly : the seventies -- Whaddarya? The eighties -- Cabin fever : the nineties -- How to live elsewhere.
Summary: "From Polynesian Mythology to the Yates' Garden Guide, from Allen Curnow to Alice Tawhai, from Jessie Mackay to Alison Wong, from Julius Vogel to Albert Wendt, from the letters of Wiremu Te Rangikaheke to the notebooks of Katherine Mansfield - Māori, Pākehā, Pasifika, and Asian New Zealanders have struggled for two and a half centuries to work the English language into some sort of truth about this place. The Auckland University Press Anthology of New Zealand Literature brings together for the first time in one volume this country's major writing, from the earliest records of exploration and encounter to the globalised, multicultural present. Editors Jane Stafford and Mark Williams range across novels and stories, poems and plays, letters and diaries, comics and songs to collect the defining stuff of our literary heritage. The contents will delight and provoke: Erewhon and The Heart of the Bush; Man Alone and 'No Ordinary Sun'; The God Boy and Hicksville; 'The Gumboot Song' and The Vintner's Luck. Through an imaginative selection and illuminating introductions, Stafford and Williams provide new paths into our writing and our country"--Publisher information.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 820.8 AUC 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From Polynesian Mythology to the Yates' Garden Guide, from Allen Curnow to Alice Tawhai, from Wiremu Te Rangikaheke's letters to Katherine Mansfield's notebooks, Maori and Pakeha New Zealanders have struggled for two and a half centuries to work the English language into some sort of truth about this place. The Auckland University Press Anthology of New Zealand Literature brings together for the first time in one volume this country's major writing, from the earliest records of exploration and encounter to the globalised, multicultural present. The editors range across fiction and nonfiction, letters and speeches, novels and stories, comics and songs to collect the heart of our literary heritage. Through an imaginative selection and illuminating introductions, Jane Stafford and Mark Williams provide new paths into our writing and our country. The Anthology of New Zealand Literature will be the indispensable introduction for years to come to what's worth reading and why.

Includes bibliographical references (1109-1144 p.) and index.

Contact -- Colonial -- Maoriland -- Between the wars -- Cultural nationalism -- Fretful sleepers : after the war -- From kiwi culture to counter-culture -- Earthly : the seventies -- Whaddarya? The eighties -- Cabin fever : the nineties -- How to live elsewhere.

"From Polynesian Mythology to the Yates' Garden Guide, from Allen Curnow to Alice Tawhai, from Jessie Mackay to Alison Wong, from Julius Vogel to Albert Wendt, from the letters of Wiremu Te Rangikaheke to the notebooks of Katherine Mansfield - Māori, Pākehā, Pasifika, and Asian New Zealanders have struggled for two and a half centuries to work the English language into some sort of truth about this place. The Auckland University Press Anthology of New Zealand Literature brings together for the first time in one volume this country's major writing, from the earliest records of exploration and encounter to the globalised, multicultural present. Editors Jane Stafford and Mark Williams range across novels and stories, poems and plays, letters and diaries, comics and songs to collect the defining stuff of our literary heritage. The contents will delight and provoke: Erewhon and The Heart of the Bush; Man Alone and 'No Ordinary Sun'; The God Boy and Hicksville; 'The Gumboot Song' and The Vintner's Luck. Through an imaginative selection and illuminating introductions, Stafford and Williams provide new paths into our writing and our country"--Publisher information.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In using the telltale "our" in their introduction to describe the national literature, Stafford and Williams give evidence that this anthology is directed mainly at New Zealand readers; likewise, the innovative divagation from chronological arrangement is contingent on readers being clued in. Nonetheless, this capacious view of a literature--as represented by, for example, the poetry of Allen Curnow, the fiction of Witi Ihimaera, and the life writing of Sylvia Ashton-Warner--has punched above its weight to contribute to world literature. The Janet Frame estate would not cooperate with the project, and even in a book so large, there are inevitable omissions, e.g., diarist Dennis McEldowney. Yet the anthology includes delights such as William Satchell's displaced young men who "take to digging kauri gum" and Hone Tuwhare's "distant point / where all roads converge." A companion publication focusing on major writers might serve the US academic market better. Yet this volume is a great gift, showing New Zealand literature as an unassuming and democratic field in which the "ordinary nameless faceless persons" of whom C. K. Stead so eloquently speaks can receive their due amid a landscape now beckoning to many world readers. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readers. N. Birns The New School