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Sex and the city / Candace Bushnell.

By: Bushnell, Candace [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Abacus, 2008Copyright date: ©2008Description: 245 pages ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780349121161 (paperback); 0349121168 (paperback).Subject(s): Single women -- New York (State) -- New York -- Fiction | Man-woman relationships -- New York (State) -- New York -- Fiction | Dating (Social customs) -- New York (State) -- New York -- Fiction | Chick lit | Manhattan (New York, N.Y.) -- Social life and customs -- Fiction | New York (N.Y.) -- Social life and customsDDC classification: 813.54
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Bushnell's beat is that demi-monde of nightclubs, bars, restaurants and parties where the rich come into contact with the infamous, the famous with the wannabes and the publicity-hungry with the gossip-peddlers' EVENING STANDARD

Wildly funny, unexpectedly poignant, wickedly observant, SEX AND THE CITY blazes a glorious, drunken cocktail trail through New York, as Candace Bushnell, columnist and social critic par excellence, trips on her Manolo Blahnik kitten heels from the Baby Doll Lounge to the Bowery Bar. An Armistead Maupin for the real world, she has the gift of assembling a huge and irresistible cast of freaks and wonders, while remaining faithful to her hard core of friends and fans: those glamorous, rebellious, crazy single women, too close to forty, who are trying hard not to turn from the Audrey Hepburn of BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S into the Glen Close of FATAL ATTRACTION, and are - still - looking for love.

Film tie-in.

Originally published: New York: Atlantic Monthly, 1996; London: Abacus, 1997.

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Excerpt provided by Syndetics

Fascinating...hilarious...Welcome to the cruel planet that is MANHATTAN. --Los Angeles TimesSly...Sharp...SEX AND THE CITY SUCCEEDS. --PeopleWelcome to the age of Un-innocence...Enter a world where the sometimes shocking and often hilarious mating habits of the privileged are exposed by a true insider. In essays drawn from her witty and sometimes brutally candid column in the New York Observer, Candace Bushnell introduces us to the young and beautiful who travel in packs from parties to bars to clubs.Meet Carrie, the quintessential young writer looking for love in all the wrong places...Mr. Big, the business tycoon who drifts from one relationship to another...Samantha Jones, the fortyish, successful, testosterone woman who uses sex like a man?not to mention Psycho Moms, Bicycle Boys, International Crazy Girls, and the rest of the New Yorkers who inspired one of the most watched TV series of our time. You've seen them on HBO, now listen to the book that started it all... Excerpted from Sex and the City by Candace Bushnell All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Bushnell extracts some gems from her "Sex and the City" column in the New York Observer, which has a devoted following. But will it play in Peoria? (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

"We're leading sensory saturated lives," announces jetsetting photographer and playboy Peter Beard in a roundtable discussion of ménages à trois, setting the tone of opulent debasement that suffuses this collection of Bushnell's punchy, archly knowing and sharply observed sex columns from the New York Observer. Prowling the modish clubs, party circuit and weekend getaways of rich and trendy New York society (most of whose denizens are identified by pseudonyms), Bushnell offers a brash, radically unromantic perspective. She visits a sex club and dates a Bicycle Boy ("the literary romantic subspecies" whose patron saints are George Plimpton and Murray Kempton). But in most chapters she keeps to the sidelines, deploying instead her alter-ego Carrie (like the author, a blonde writer from Connecticut in her mid-30s), whose sweet if feckless romance with Mr. Big‘a nondescript power player‘serves as a foil for the hilarious, unsentimentalized misadventures of her peers. These include model-chasers like Barkley, 25, a painter with the face of a Botticelli angel whose parents pay for his SoHo junior loft, and Tom Peri, the "emotional Mayflower," who ferries newly dumped women to higher emotional ground and is then invariably dumped. The effect is that of an Armistead Maupin-like canvas tinged with a liberal smattering of Judith Krantz. Collected in one volume, Bushnell's characters grow generic, but in small doses these essays are brain candy that will appeal equally to urban romantics and anti-romantics. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Kirkus Book Review

Fascinating and haunting insights into the love lives of the rich and randy in New York. Bushnell has gleaned pieces from her popular New York Observer column and combined them into an oddly touching collection. While the privileged, beautiful, pony-skin-boot-wearing folk she reports on seem ripe for parody, Bushnell has chosen to humanize them. The earlier articles feature Bushnell herself; she wisely removes herself from the later pieces, writing with the detached grace of an early Didion, and allows her friend (and alter ego?) Carrie to do the reporting. In one story, Carrie and her friends journey to Connecticut's wealthy suburbs to attend a wedding shower, complaining all the way. Bushnell perfectly captures the poignant moment when the New York group, glossy and single, realize that they are in fact jealous of their settled friend. The realization leads to a series of confessions: One woman nervously admits that she broke her ankle while rollerblading in an attempt to impress the younger man she was dating. Many of these pieces focus on the rise and fall of Carrie's relationship with ``Mr. Big,'' who is a better date than most of the model-obsessed men she meets, but who is a ``toxic bachelor'' (unappreciative, self-centered, allergic to commitment) all the same. Bushnell's point, at its simplest level, is that what the glamorous women she writes about really want is a husband. But her writing is more sensitive than that, subtly catching the ways in which, beneath the veneer of Manolo Blahnik shoes and the eternal round of parties and the late nights at trendy bars, New York is a cruel place for smart, older women. Whatever lip service their male peers pay to equality, what men want is perpetual youth. Often funny and occasionally bleak, this is a captivating look at the ``Age of Un-Innocence,'' in a city in which the glittering diversions don't quite make up for the fact that ``Cupid has flown the coop.''