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Kerrigan in Copenhagen / by Thomas E. Kennedy.

By: Kennedy, Thomas E, 1944- [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: London : Bloomsbury, 2013Description: 242 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781408841945 (pbk.); 1408841940 (pbk.).Subject(s): Americans -- Denmark -- Fiction | Bars (Drinking establishments) -- Denmark -- Copenhagen -- Fiction | Self-actualization (Psychology) -- Fiction | Copenhagen (Denmark) -- FictionGenre/Form: General fiction. DDC classification: 813.54 Summary: Kerrigan is writing a guide book to his adopted city of Copenhagen. Specifically, a guide to the city's drinking establishments--of which there are more than 1,500.Thus, it is a project potentially without end, and one with a certain amount of numbness built into it, through countless drinks imbibed. And that is part of the point: for Kerrigan, an American expat fleeing a brutal family tragedy, has plenty he wants to numb.The only problem with his project is his research associate, a voluptuous, green eyed gal who makes him tremble.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection KEN 1 Available T00556031
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Kerrigan is writing a guide book to his adopted city of Copenhagen. Specifically, a guide to the city's drinking establishments - of which there are over 1,500. Thus, it is a project potentially without end, and one with a certain amount of drunken numbness built into it. And that's the point- for Kerrigan, an American expat fleeing a terrible betrayal, has plenty he wants to forget. The only problem with his proposed project is his research associate, a voluptuous, green-eyed beauty who makes him tremble with forgotten desire.<br> Kerrigan in Copenhagen is both a love story and a Joycean romp through a magical city -- its people, history, literature and culture. It cements Kennedy's reputation as a novelist of tremendous talent.

Includes bibliographical references.

Kerrigan is writing a guide book to his adopted city of Copenhagen. Specifically, a guide to the city's drinking establishments--of which there are more than 1,500.Thus, it is a project potentially without end, and one with a certain amount of numbness built into it, through countless drinks imbibed. And that is part of the point: for Kerrigan, an American expat fleeing a brutal family tragedy, has plenty he wants to numb.The only problem with his project is his research associate, a voluptuous, green eyed gal who makes him tremble.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This follow-up to the award-winning Kennedy's In the Company of Angels and Falling Sideways, also set in Copenhagen, where the author lives, is aptly subtitled. About a third of the book focuses on the late-middle-aged Kerrigan, who ponders his treacherous former wife and growing attraction to his svelte, 50ish associate, who is helping him research his book about Copenhagen's "Top 100 Bars." The narrative also acts as a travel guide through the capital city's history and historical landmarks (and bars, of which there are 1,500) and as ample commentary on literature, centering on Danes Hans Christian Andersen and Soren Kierkegaard and comparing Kierkegaard's Johannes the Seducer (in Either/Or) to Goethe's Werther. We're also treated to Irishman James Joyce and mention of authors ranging from Matthew Arnold to Emile Zola, followed by more commentary on jazz. This up-and-down kind of boozy journey is well worth the time, as long as one doesn't mind what part of the story predominates at any given moment. VERDICT Kennedy's obvious love for Copenhagen drives an exciting work with appeal to the well read.-Robert E. Brown, Oswego, NY (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Veteran writer Kennedy (Falling Sideways, 2011) once again showcases his authorial bravado and passion for Copenhagen in this so-called love story, his fourth novel about the city. Committed to constructing a guidebook to the finest of Copenhagen's 1,500-plus watering holes, American immigrant and failed poet Kerrigan wanders the city with a copy of Finnegans Wake in his pocket, a quote on his tongue, and a devastating, guarded past. Accompanying him from one serving house to the next is his Associate, a green-eyed local woman whose research eases Kerrigan's job and whose loveliness and wit steer him from his task. As Kerrigan stumbles through the onetime hometown of Kierkegaard and Hans Christian Andersen, he pieces together not a drinker's guidebook so much as a painful unveiling of his past and a literary and cultural history of his assumed home. Through Kerrigan's curiosity and astute (if not drunken) musings on everything from music to art to sex, Kennedy proves to be an intellectual and entertaining guide to a remarkable city and to the deepest longings of a broken, aging man.--Fullmer, Jonathan Copyright 2010 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

A sui generis work, the third in the author's Copenhagen Quartet, following In the Company of Angels (2010) and Falling Sideways (2011); these stand-alone novels have nothing in common save their Copenhagen setting. Though the viewpoint character Kerrigan is not Kennedy's alter ego, they overlap. Both are Irish-American expatriate writers, long resident in the Danish capital. Kerrigan's current commissioned project is to sample Copenhagen's bars (there are over 1,500) and write up the best 100; for the research, he has an associate, a woman in her late 50s, like himself. The bars they visit are itemized in boldface, guidebook style. It's a hopefully never-ending project for Kerrigan, a serious drinker and a lover of Copenhagen (the novel is subtitled "a love story"). That love expands to pay tribute to the city's history and its literary giants (Kierkegaard, Hans Christian Andersen). Coiled in this thicket of names, among the dates he rattles off like an auctioneer, is the story of Kerrigan's devastating loss. He was lecturing at the university on verisimilitude, the writer's creation of illusion, when a student transfixed him. Blonde, blue-eyed Licia was 20 years his junior but appeared equally attracted. They married, had a baby. Then, pregnant again, Licia disappeared with their daughter. Divorce papers followed. That was three years ago; the wound is still raw. What festers most is her accusation: "You are so blind." Kerrigan is haunted by the irony that he, an authority on illusion, had been blinded by the illusion of love. All this he confesses to his associate, after bedding her; but, still in turmoil, he takes a quick trip to Dublin, meditating on Joyce. This attempt "to clothe himself in history and literature" doesn't work, and a solo pub-crawl back in Copenhagen almost does him in. It's 1999, fin de sicle, and maybe fin de Kerrigan, for the doctor has discovered clotting in both lungs. Kerrigan's unresolved angst is the artificial heart of this real, joyous celebration of Copenhagen.]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.