Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Bond girl / Erin Duffy.

By: Duffy, Erin [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Leicester : Thorpe, 2013Copyright date: ©2012Edition: Large print ed.Description: 412 pages (large print) ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781444816235 (hbk.); 1444816233.Subject(s): Finance -- Fiction | Life change events -- Fiction | Female friendship -- Fiction | Wall Street (New York, N.Y.) -- FictionGenre/Form: Humorous fiction. | Large type books. Online resources: Click here to access online Summary: Being the new girl in one of New York's biggest banks isn't what Alex Garrett expected. For one thing, she gets a fold-up chair and no desk - apparently some people don't last long enough to need their own chair... For another, her colleagues aren't quite the geeks she feared. In fact, pretty soon she's having the time of her life. Sure, it's not ideal when you lose thousands of dollars on your first trade, and no she hadn't really expected to be sent for car-loads of pizzas for breakfast - without a car... But she soon realises that the crazy, shocking, hilarious group of men that surround her could be the best friends she ever had, and one of them may become even more.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Large Print Davis (Central) Library
Large Print
Large Print DUF 1 Available T00534629
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Alex Garrett discovers that it takes her only one minute to lose her bank $93,000 on her first trade. Welcome to the world of finance. Being at the bottom of the corporate ladder in one of Wall street's biggest powerhouses is like having landed in a giant adult playground for new-girl-on-the-block Alex.

Being the new girl in one of New York's biggest banks isn't what Alex Garrett expected. For one thing, she gets a fold-up chair and no desk - apparently some people don't last long enough to need their own chair... For another, her colleagues aren't quite the geeks she feared. In fact, pretty soon she's having the time of her life. Sure, it's not ideal when you lose thousands of dollars on your first trade, and no she hadn't really expected to be sent for car-loads of pizzas for breakfast - without a car... But she soon realises that the crazy, shocking, hilarious group of men that surround her could be the best friends she ever had, and one of them may become even more.

Adult.

11 18 34 37 96 114 132

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Fresh out of college, Alex lands a job on Wall Street training in bond sales. While it's difficult to break into the boys' club of a trading firm (she is given a folding metal chair inscribed "Girlie" instead of a desk, she's the office gofer, and practical jokes abound), Alex makes the best of it and tries to work as hard as she can. She is often fixing her boss's spreadsheets until midnight, in between Starbucks runs juggling dozens of cups and dodging a slimy client who threatens to make her quit if she won't sleep with him. When Alex finally gets the chance to execute an actual trade, she loses the firm nearly $100,000 with one mistake. Despite this, she keeps her job and even finds time to date a cute coworker. When the financial crisis hits, it's time for Alex to take stock and figure out if the stress is worth it. VERDICT Despite financial details that may make your head spin and a workplace that will make your stomach churn, Duffy's fresh take on the single-in-the-city tale does a terrific job of reviving chick lit (not every girl works in publishing or PR, after all). [See Prepub Alert, 8/21/11; debut author Duffy has worked for over ten years on Wall Street.-Ed.]-Rebecca Vnuk, Forest Park, IL (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Despite promising insider secrets about what really happens at a Wall Street firm, Duffy's debut crashes as fast as the stock market did. Alex Garrett, a recent college graduate who began her Wall Street career in 2006, dreams of fast-talking days on the trading floor. Instead, she sits on a folding chair at a government bond desk, fetches ridiculously large takeout orders, and serves as a doormat for her colleagues, as well as the office ladies' man she dates. While the peculiar tasks Alex is forced to fulfill with a "yes, sir" attitude, and the crazy tales of work life pique the reader's curiosity, these stories quickly become boring. Unfortunately, Duffy's attempt to sell her trade secrets doesn't pan out, and it's hard to sustain interest by the time she gets to the number one thing you'll want to know about working on "the Street." (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

After a childhood introduction to the fast-paced world of Wall Street, sweetly naive Alex has landed a position at one of the finance industry's most prestigious firms. Instead of being guided through the finer points of bond trading, however, Alex is initially given tasks mostly centered on taking lunch orders and keeping everyone's nicknames straight. As she is accorded more responsibility, the realities of the financial industry and the mostly male egos around her conspire to make her job a little more difficult than she anticipated. Like The Devil Wears Prada (2003) set on Wall Street, Duffy's first novel is a sharp, witty look at the intricacies of the trading floor and the people who populate it. The writing is clever and articulate, and Alex's story of personal growth makes her a sympathetic, likable heroine. Filled with too-good-to-be-true anecdotes and enough of a biting, cynical bent to offset the chick-lit romance angle, Bond Girl is a fun read-alike to the canons of Weisberger, Kinsella, and Green. Duffy's acknowledgment of the recent financial collapse and ensuing recession makes Bond Girl an entertaining and timely read.--Turza, Stephanie Copyright 2010 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Devil Wears Prada model.]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.