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East to the Amazon : in search of Great Paititi and the trade routes of the ancients / John Blashford-Snell and Richard Snailham.

By: Blashford-Snell, John, 1936-.
Contributor(s): Snailham, Richard | Snailham, Richard [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : John Murray, 2002Description: 235 pages, [8] pages of plates : color illustrations, maps, color portraits ; 24cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0719560322; 0719565049.Subject(s): Blashford-Snell, John -- Travel -- South America | El Dorado | Blashford-Snell, John, 1936 -- Travel | Snailham, Richard Journeys -- South America | Amazon River Description and travel | Travel Amazon | South America -- Description and travel | Amazon River -- Description and travelDDC classification: 910.4 | 918.044
Contents:
Setting the Goals -- Reconnaissance -- Into the Field -- To 'Worry Conker' -- Meanwhile, Back at Fort Mogg -- To the Rio Tulani -- Going Back Down -- Guanay to Rurrenabaque -- Rapid Work -- Lost and Found -- Pots and Smoking Maria -- Some Madeira, My Dear -- Between the Banks -- Developments on the Amazon -- The Anaconda Moment -- A Bumpy Finish -- New York, New York -- Aftermath.
Review: "The mythical land of Great Paititi, east of the Andes, attracted conquistadors, archaeologists, adventurers and even, more recently, Nazis fleeing justice. John Blashford-Snell has always felt the lure of lost cities and in particular of Paititi, the city the Spanish conquistadors called El Dorado. In May 2001 he set off through dense rain-forest with a full team of jungle-bashers, archaeologists, soldiers and scientists to reach the area where the dangerously snake-infested ruins were believed to be. What they found was not a city but what seemed to be an ancient centre for ritual." "The success of two earlier expeditions, Kota Mama I and II, had shown that ancient peoples could have sailed boats made of reed from Lake Titicaca southwards and eastwards to the Atlantic. Now Blashford-Snell set off to prove that the ancient peoples of Paititi could have used the long succession of ever-widening rivers that end at the mouth of the Amazon as trade routes to the Old World. Kota Mama III, a reed trimaran with three jaguar figureheads, faced a frightening 500 kilometres of rapids to prove the point."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 980 BLA 1 Available
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 980 BLA 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The mythical land of Great Paititi, east of the Andes, attracted conquistadors, archaeologists, adventurers and even, more recently, Nazis fleeing justice. John Blashford-Snell has always felt the lure of lost cities and in particular of Paititi, the city the Spanish conquistadors called El Dorado. In May 2001, he set off through dense rainforest with a full team of jungle-bashers, archaeologists, soldiers and scientists to reach the area where the dangerously snake-infested ruins were believed to be. What they found was not a city but what seemed to be an ancient centre for ritual.

Davey Bequest.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Setting the Goals -- 2. Reconnaissance -- 3. Into the Field -- 4. To 'Worry Conker' -- 5. Meanwhile, Back at Fort Mogg -- 6. To the Rio Tulani -- 7. Going Back Down -- 8. Guanay to Rurrenabaque -- 9. Rapid Work -- 10. Lost and Found -- 11. Pots and Smoking Maria -- 12. Some Madeira, My Dear -- 13. Between the Banks -- 14. Developments on the Amazon -- 15. The Anaconda Moment -- 16. A Bumpy Finish -- 17. New York, New York -- 18. Aftermath.

"The mythical land of Great Paititi, east of the Andes, attracted conquistadors, archaeologists, adventurers and even, more recently, Nazis fleeing justice. John Blashford-Snell has always felt the lure of lost cities and in particular of Paititi, the city the Spanish conquistadors called El Dorado. In May 2001 he set off through dense rain-forest with a full team of jungle-bashers, archaeologists, soldiers and scientists to reach the area where the dangerously snake-infested ruins were believed to be. What they found was not a city but what seemed to be an ancient centre for ritual." "The success of two earlier expeditions, Kota Mama I and II, had shown that ancient peoples could have sailed boats made of reed from Lake Titicaca southwards and eastwards to the Atlantic. Now Blashford-Snell set off to prove that the ancient peoples of Paititi could have used the long succession of ever-widening rivers that end at the mouth of the Amazon as trade routes to the Old World. Kota Mama III, a reed trimaran with three jaguar figureheads, faced a frightening 500 kilometres of rapids to prove the point."--BOOK JACKET.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This adventure saga recounts the British-based Scientific Exploration Society's South American journey from the Andes to the Atlantic in May 2001. Readers are taken on a land journey to the supposed ruins of Paititi, a lost Bolivian city, and then follow the authors as they travel down the challenging Madeira and Amazon Rivers, often in a traditional reed boat. The story is heavily supported with logistical information, historical facts, reflections on earlier explorers, and interesting tidbits on such things as latex production, archaeology, and herpetology. All the ingredients for a superb armchair adventure are here, which make it all the more unfortunate that the presentation sometimes seems subdued and lackluster, and the supporting material a distraction from the journey at hand, causing the story to lose momentum. The book, however, still has merit in its descriptive and detailed first-hand account of a unique journey in a very remote river and rain forest environment. For larger libraries. Jo-Anne Mary Benson, Osgoode, Ont. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

A bit of late-high-imperial adventure deep in the wilds of South America, from two English explorers. Blashford-Snell, our narrator and man in charge, launched the expedition (Snailham participated in its final leg) in May 2001 with two objectives. The first was to determine if a reed boat could navigate its way from the Bolivian coca region to the Atlantic, thus making some sense out of why cocaine was found in the ancient, mummified body of an Egyptian princess. The second was to follow the lure of a lost Incan city, Paititi--"South America has a good tally of such lost cities," remarks Blashford-Snell in a comment typical of his prose style, which feels like it has been torn from a Victorian adventure story. " 'I've been thinking,' he said when we met him," begins one characteristic passage. "This was ominous. Oswaldo, often inscrutable and enigmatic, had a penchant for dramatic throwaway observations." The ensuing capers are strewn with equally appropriate characters: Leopold d'Arenberg, "a prince of the Holy Roman Empire"; Marigold Verity-Dick, a harpist whose "sweet evening recitals had soothed many a savage breast"; and the sinister Austrian Sigfried Trippolt, whose rotten behavior prompts Blashford-Snell to crow, "a highly satisfactory instance of local obstructionism taking on British determination and coming off a poor second." The expedition didn't prove anything per se, but the explorers did unearth some important archaeological sites, the medical team performed lots of good works, and some of the conservation studies may bear critical fruit. But it is the swash and buckle of it all that really matters here: tackling a monstrous, murderous set of rapids head on with a reed boat and getting beaten like a gong, keeping an eye skinned for vipers and giant fire ants, or besting the Nazis yet again. Blashford-Snell may have come up short on scientific results, but not even a mad dog would challenge him to a sitting contest in the noonday sun. (25 color photos) Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.