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The vanishing point [text (large print)] / Val McDermid.

By: McDermid, Val.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Leicester : Thorpe, 2013, c2012Edition: Large print edition.Description: 514 pages (large print) ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781444815542 (hbk.); 1444815547 (hbk.).Subject(s): United States. Federal Bureau of Investigation -- Fiction | Kidnapping -- Fiction | Murder -- Fiction | Family secrets -- Fiction | Large type booksGenre/Form: Detective and mystery fiction. | Thrillers (Fiction) | Large type books.Online resources: Click here to access online Summary: Stephanie Harker is travelling through the security gates at O'Hare airport, on her way to an idyllic holiday. Five-year-old Jimmy goes through the metal detector first. But then, stuck on the other side of security, she watches in panic and disbelief as a uniformed agent leads her boy away. The authorities, unaware of Jimmy's existence, become alerted by Stephanie's erratic behaviour. She finds herself brutally wrestled to the ground, and restrained - before she can finally inform them what has happened...and Jimmy is long gone. However, as Stephanie tells her story to the FBI, it's evident that this seemingly normal family is not what it seems. What is Jimmy's background? Why would someone abduct him? And, with time running out, how can Stephanie get him back?
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Large Print Rangiora Street Library
Large Print
Large Print MCD 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Stephanie Harker is travelling through security at O'Hare airport with five-year-old Jimmy. But in a moment, everything changes. In disbelief, Stephanie watches as a uniformed agent leads her boy away - and she's stuck the other side of the gates, hysterical with worry. The authorities, unaware of Jimmy's existence, just see a woman behaving erratically; Stephanie is wrestled to the ground and blasted with a taser gun. By the time she can tell them what has happened, Jimmy is long gone. But as Stephanie tells her story to the FBI, it becomes clear that everything is not as it seems.

"It's every parent's worst nightmare..." -- Cover.

Complete and unabridged.

Originally published: London: Little, Brown, 2012.

Stephanie Harker is travelling through the security gates at O'Hare airport, on her way to an idyllic holiday. Five-year-old Jimmy goes through the metal detector first. But then, stuck on the other side of security, she watches in panic and disbelief as a uniformed agent leads her boy away. The authorities, unaware of Jimmy's existence, become alerted by Stephanie's erratic behaviour. She finds herself brutally wrestled to the ground, and restrained - before she can finally inform them what has happened...and Jimmy is long gone. However, as Stephanie tells her story to the FBI, it's evident that this seemingly normal family is not what it seems. What is Jimmy's background? Why would someone abduct him? And, with time running out, how can Stephanie get him back?

Adult.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Scottish crime series writer and novelist McDermid's (The Retribution; Trick of the Dark) new stand-alone begins with a horrific abduction. Flying to America from London for a holiday, Stephanie Harker watches helplessly as her young charge Jimmy is kidnapped from an airport security checkpoint. The backstory begins when ghostwriter Stephanie takes a job penning an autobiography for Scarlett Higgins, a seemingly self-absorbed reality television star. Stephanie feels their relationship grow from that of a professional writer interviewing a client to one of friendship. But circumstances end in tragedy for the duplicitous Scarlett, leaving Stephanie to unravel the mystery that ensues. Using British colloquialisms and local perspectives, McDermid draws readers into a country where afternoon tea and biscuits may differ from our fare, but her riveting read reaches across cultures. A delightful reference at the end of the book compares American and British phrases. Verdict Nikki French fans will relate to the English setting and psychological aspects. [This title was previewed in editors' picks from BookExpo America, "From Magick to BBQ & Backlist," LJ 7/12.-Ed.]-Susan Carr, Edwardsville P.L., IL (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Putting her series characters Tony Hill and Carol Jordan on the back burner temporarily, McDermid (The Retribution) delivers a solid stand-alone combining the high-stakes hunt for a missing child with the dark underbelly of celebrity culture. Usually content to work behind the scenes, ghostwriter Stephanie Harker's world changes when she signs on to write reality-TV star Scarlett Higgins's autobiography. A brash former contestant from the fictional British show Goldfish Bowl, Scarlett has made a career out of being outspoken. Stephanie and Scarlett develop an unlikely friendship, and Stephanie grows attached to Scarlett's son, Jimmy, whose father is a fame-crazed DJ. When Scarlett discovers she's dying of cancer, the question of Jimmy's future looms large. Since McDermid opens with a chilling scene in which five-year-old son Jimmy, traveling with Stephanie, is snatched from Chicago's O'Hare Airport, it's clear whom Scarlett ultimately chooses to look after her son. Stephanie and Scarlett's often tumultuous relationship is glimpsed in flashbacks, juxtaposed with the present-day search for Jimmy, hampered both by the fact that he's not Stephanie's son and the slickness of a kidnapper who leaves no tracks. Though Stephanie is quickly forgettable, larger-than-life Scarlett is a chance for McDermid to explore a different kind of ugliness than she tackles in her series novels. (Sept. 2012) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

Best-selling crime novelist McDermid has written more than 25 mysteries. Her latest puts a magnifying glass on the indignities and frustrations people experience with airport security, crafting a totally credible and nightmarish situation. A young woman and her five-year-old charge are traveling from London to Chicago's O'Hare. The woman is pulled aside for a search behind the Perspex enclosure. She sees a man dressed as a TSA agent lead the young child away and is faced with the Kafkaesque plight of being stuck and suspect while the child is kidnapped. After this amazing opening, McDermid backtracks to five years earlier, to the connection that this woman, a ghostwriter, has with a British reality TV show star. The suspense loses its steam here, as far too much time is spent on the UK's celebrity culture. When we return to the search for the young child, the novel picks up again, but valuable intensity has been lost. Not McDermid at her best, but a story that will generate palpable frisson for contemporary readers.--Fletcher, Connie Copyright 2014 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Against all expectations, London ghostwriter Stephanie Harker becomes friends with her latest subject, bad girl reality show star Scarlett Higgins, only to become caught up in a scheme that leads to the abduction of Scarlett's little boy. The book opens at Chicago's O'Hare Airport, where Stephanie, who has become five-year-old Jimmy's guardian, flips out when she sees a male stranger lead him away as she's being examined in a security box. After being Tasered by agents and told she's making up the abduction, she pours out an exhaustive account of the events leading up to it to a sympathetic female FBI agent. Though "Scarlett Harlot" gained fame as an epithet-spouting bimbo on a survivor-type show, Goldfish Bowl, she actually is a woman of savvy intelligence who invented that image to escape her bad circumstances. Like Stephanie, whose moody musician boyfriend attempts to control her, Scarlett has a disagreeable mate: a gadabout club DJ who is into drugs and guns. The women become close, shutting the men out of their lives after Jimmy is born, and closer still after Scarlett is diagnosed with cancer. To escape the tabloids, Scarlett imports a half sister who looks a lot like her to be her public surrogate. The story also involves a British detective with whom Stephanie becomes involved, a doctor who devotes himself to the terminal Scarlett, and a Romanian nanny. For all its twists, the narrative never gains traction. The plotting is so mechanical, the writing so pedestrian ("She watched, the tension in her body growing with every passing minute"), you half suspect this book was concocted not by McDermid, author of such masterpieces as A Place of Execution (2000), but a different kind of ghostwriter. If anything vanishes in this book, it's the first-rate writing fans of McDermid (best known in the States for her Wire in the Blood series) have come to expect.]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.