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Empire and honor / W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV.

By: Griffin, W. E. B.
Contributor(s): Butterworth, William E. (William Edmund).
Material type: TextTextSeries: Griffin, W. E. B. Honor bound: 7.; Griffin, W. E. B. Honor bound: 07.Publisher: Sutton : Severn House, 2013Description: 517 pages ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780727882448 (hbk.); 0727882449 (hbk.).Subject(s): United States. Office of Strategic Services -- Fiction | World War, 1939-1945 -- Secret service -- United States -- Fiction | World War, 1939-1945 -- Secret service -- Soviet Union -- Fiction | Atomic bomb -- FictionGenre/Form: Spy stories. | Action and adventure fiction. DDC classification: 813.54 Summary: Frade and company must face one of their most delicate and dangerous tasks to date...October 1945: The Germans and Japanese have surrendered. For Cletus Frade and his colleagues in the OSS, it should be time to pack up, but they have far more important things to do. The United States made a secret deal with the German head of intelligence: in exchange for the identity of the Soviet spies in the American atomic bomb program, his people would be spirited to safety. Frade and company must keep everyone safe - but some people have other ideas.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection GRI 1 Available T00521950
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Frade and company must face one of their most delicate and dangerous tasks to date . . . <br> October 1945: The Germans and Japanese have surrendered. For Cletus Frade and his colleagues in the OSS, it should be time to pack up, but they have far more important things to do. The United States made a secret deal with the German head of intelligence: in exchange for the identity of the Soviet spies in the American atomic bomb program, his people would be spirited to safety. Frade and company must keep everyone safe - but some people have other ideas . . .

Frade and company must face one of their most delicate and dangerous tasks to date...October 1945: The Germans and Japanese have surrendered. For Cletus Frade and his colleagues in the OSS, it should be time to pack up, but they have far more important things to do. The United States made a secret deal with the German head of intelligence: in exchange for the identity of the Soviet spies in the American atomic bomb program, his people would be spirited to safety. Frade and company must keep everyone safe - but some people have other ideas.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Bestseller Griffin's seventh Honor Bound book, co-written with son Butterworth like the previous entry, 2011's Victory and Honor, continues the series' tradition of bringing espionage's shadow wars to vivid life. Though WWII is over, the pressure on OSS Lt. Col. Cletus Frade is not, due to Operation Phoenix, a long-festering Nazi contingency plan against wartime defeat that aims to establish South American bases from which to launch the Reich's resurrection. U.S. intelligence becomes concerned that U-boats are bringing weapons-grade uranium to conspirators waiting in Argentina to carry on Hitler's legacy. Frade launches a covert op, which Truman "could not have ordered" (to preserve plausible deniability), to prevent the makings of a nuclear weapon from reaching the wrong hands. The pages fly by as the authors mix action and intrigue with a fascinating look at Juan Peron and the Argentina of 1945. Agent: Robert Youdelman. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

October 1945. Germany and Japan have both surrendered, bringing the war to an end. But for Cletus Frade and his band of brave brothers at the OSS, the war is far from over. Unbeknownst to most of the world, the U.S. government, in the closing days of the war, made a deal with Germany, one that involved getting certain German officials to Argentina in exchange for valuable information concerning Soviet intelligence activities within the American military program. Empire and Honor continues on from 2011's Victory and Honor, jumping forward about half a year but continuing the story pretty much seamlessly. The disbanding of the OSS has begun; KGB spies inside the Manhattan Project are still posing a major risk to national security; emerging global political conflict makes the chances of a postwar peace look slim. Lively and exciting, the book should please the authors' many fans.--Pitt, David Copyright 2010 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

The seventh in Griffin's (Victory and Honor, 2011, etc.) Honor Bound series offers more of USMC Maj. Cletus Frade's escapades. Here, Griffin's all-stuff-military-andintrigue battleground is Argentina. The time is immediately postWorld War II, with Juan Pern and Evita double-dealing and Nazis on the side. The good-guy movers and shakers believe the USSR is the next enemy, and remnants of the disbanded OSS (soon to be CIA) want to hide the high command of Abwehr Ost, the Wehrmacht's anti-communist intelligence group, in Argentina far away from the Soviets. The U.S. rocket program needed von Braun; the spooks needed Abwehr Ost. Argentina is the chosen hideaway, which is complicated by the fact that Argentina is also the lair of Operation Phoenix, a plan by Nazi SS-types dead set on reincarnating fascism. Frade's late biological father was a rich Argentine colonel, and so Frade's unofficially charged with rooting out bad Germans and securing good Germans. This book maintains Griffin's standard narrative trick of employing heroes with stupendous wealth, airplanes and secure hideaways readily available. Frade also happens to be Pern's godson, but Frade dislikes Tio Juan, which muddies dealings with the Argentine government, mainly Gen. Bernardo Martn, chief of the Bureau of Internal Security. Some Argentines want to assassinate Pern, but many don't, in spite of Pern being corrupt and overly ambitious, since Pern's death might spark a civil war. The primary narrative thread involves locating U-234, a submarine that ferried scheming SS-types intent on persevering with fascism's failures. U-234 also hauled a half-ton of uranium oxide the SS bad guys want to sell to the USSR to finance Operation Phoenix. Although heavily reliant on exposition, the book provides sufficient back story and works as a stand-alone read. Nothing beats a cinder-blocksized adventure novel on a winter weekend.]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.