Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Paint it black: a novel Janet Fitch.

By: Fitch, Janet, 1955-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York Little, Brown, 2006Edition: First edition.Description: pages cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0316182745.Subject(s): Young women -- Fiction | First loves -- Fiction | Bereavement -- Fiction | Los Angeles (Calif.) -- FictionGenre/Form: Psychological fiction.DDC classification: 813/.54 Review: "Josie Tyrell, art model, teen runaway, and denizen of LA's rock scene, finds a chance at real love with art student Michael Faraday. A Harvard dropout and son of a renowned pianist, Michael introduces Josie to a world of sophistication she had never dreamed existed and to his spiritual quest for the beauty that shines through everyday experience. But when she receives a call from the Los Angeles County coroner, asking her to identify her lover's dead body, her bright dreams all turn to black." ""What happens to a dream when the dreamer is gone?" This is the question Josie asks as she searches for the key to understanding Michael's death. And as she struggles to hold on to the true world he shared with her, she is both repelled by and attracted to Michael's pianist mother, Meredith, who holds Josie responsible for her son's torment. Joined by their grief, the two women are soon drawn into a twisted relationship that reflects equal parts distrust and blind need."--BOOK JACKET.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection FITC 1 Checked out 03/12/2019

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From the bestselling author of White Oleander comes a powerful story of passion, first love, and a young woman's search for a true world in the aftermath of loss.

"Josie Tyrell, art model, teen runaway, and denizen of LA's rock scene, finds a chance at real love with art student Michael Faraday. A Harvard dropout and son of a renowned pianist, Michael introduces Josie to a world of sophistication she had never dreamed existed and to his spiritual quest for the beauty that shines through everyday experience. But when she receives a call from the Los Angeles County coroner, asking her to identify her lover's dead body, her bright dreams all turn to black." ""What happens to a dream when the dreamer is gone?" This is the question Josie asks as she searches for the key to understanding Michael's death. And as she struggles to hold on to the true world he shared with her, she is both repelled by and attracted to Michael's pianist mother, Meredith, who holds Josie responsible for her son's torment. Joined by their grief, the two women are soon drawn into a twisted relationship that reflects equal parts distrust and blind need."--BOOK JACKET.

2 7 11 19 20 34 44 62 66 77 80 83 89 94 96 104 121 124 135 144 168 169

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

Josie Tyrell, teen runaway and fledgling model/actress, thinks she's found her chance at real love and a greater world in Michael Faraday--artist and Harvard dropout, son of a renowned concert pianist--until the day she receives a call from the Los Angeles County Coroner, asking her to identify her lover's body. In the aftermath of Michael's suicide, Josie struggles to hold on to the world they shared. Compounding her grief and rage is Michael's pianist mother, Meredith Loewy, who returns to her native city with the news of her only son's death. Despite a fierce mutual enmity, the two women find themselves drawn into an eerie relationship reflecting equal parts distrust and blind need. Excerpted from Paint It Black by Janet Fitch All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Disavowing her sad-sack family, Josie ends up in Los Angeles-and in love with brilliant Michael, whose suicide leads Josie to out-and-out battle with his formidable mom. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Fitch follows her bestselling debut, White Oleander, by revisiting the insidious effects of a powerful, narcissistic mother on an only child. Michael Faraday is a Harvard dropout who paints in the L.A. art world of 1981; his suicide happens a few pages in, and sets the stage for a Fitch's masterful shifts in time and perspective. Josie Tyrell, an artist's model and denizen of the punk rock, had an intense relationship with Michael, but never managed to free him from his mother, renowned concert pianist Meredith Loewy, who moves in a bleak, loveless world of wealth and privilege. Yet their very different loves for Michael bring about a surprising alliance between the imperious Meredith and Josie, a white trash escapee whose inborn grace, style and sense of self sustain her-along with art, music and alcohol. The two find unexpected comfort in each other's shared loss, allowing Fitch to contrast the inner and outer resources of women whose lives couldn't be more different, and to flash back deeply into their histories. Fitch excels at painting a negative personality with sure-handed depth and fairness, and her prose penetrates the inner lives of the two with immediacy and bite. In Josie, she has created an indomitable young woman whose pluck and growing self-awareness beautifully offset Meredith's emptiness. Their relationship transforms a big cliche-the artist's suicide-into a page-turning psychodrama. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Booklist Review

Set in 1980s Los Angeles, Fitch's follow-up to the Oprah selection White Oleander (1999) opens with Josie Tyrell receiving a devastating call informing her that the body of her boyfriend, Michael Faraday, has been found in a hotel room. Josie can't understand why Michael would take his own life; in her eyes, their relationship had been perfect. Michael's wealthy mother, Meredith, a concert pianist, believes the blame for her son's death rests on his lower-class, art-model girlfriend. She chases Josie from the funeral, then seeks her out days later, helplessly drawn to the last person her son was close to. Josie resents Meredith's disdain, but is similarly curious about the woman who raised Michael. An unlikely pair, Josie and Meredith circle each other warily until Meredith decides to remake Josie in her image, possibly at the expense of Josie's identity. Layered and piercing, Fitch's second outing explores the many levels of grief and sets up an unexpected recovery in a tale certain to please Fitch's countless fans. --Kristine Huntley Copyright 2006 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Bereavement, alienation and survivor's anger are the legacy bequeathed to the stunned protagonist of Californian Fitch's somber second novel. Josie Tyrell is a 20-year-old artist's model, sometime-actress and substance-abuser whose already chaotic life in L.A.'s underground artistic environs is further unsettled when she's notified that her boyfriend, Michael Faraday, has killed himself in a rundown motel. As she did in her Oprah-selected White Oleander (1999), Fitch structures this as a contest between two determined women: embittered Josie (who's intent on learning why her rapturous life with Michael, a struggling artist, wasn't enough for him), and Michael's mother, Meredith Loewy, a celebrated concert pianist and smothering matriarch whose attitude toward Josie vacillates between homicidal resentment and almost sisterly empathy. This backward-and-forward momentum at least varies Fitch's numbing concentration on Josie's emotional outrage, as does a subplot involving an independent movie in production (whose cluelessly smug director envisions it as "Bergman meets Hitchcock in Antonioni's unmade bed"), a preening sex machine who calls himself Nick Nitro and a handsome young actor who worms his way into Josie's bed without ever eliciting a response from her. But the changing relationship of Meredith and Josie is central, and the story almost catches fire as Fitch peels away successive layers of pretense to reveal each woman's hidden story (Meredith's history of losing other loved ones before Michael, Josie's uncomfortable memories of her white-trash family and sexually threatening older brother). Yet it wallows in self-pity and indignation, even in the climactic pages, where Josie believes she knows Meredith's real secret, returns to that motel and acknowledges the truth about Michael, which she has unsuccessfully repressed: "He loved me, but he hated himself more." Vivid writing here and there, but Josie is a dull character, and the story is a real downer. Copyright ┬ęKirkus Reviews, used with permission.