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The Beach Street Knitting Society and Yarn Club / Gil McNeil.

By: McNeil, Gil, 1959-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Voice/Hyperion, c2009Edition: First edition.Description: 404 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781401341220.Uniform titles: Divas don't knit Subject(s): Widows -- Fiction | Families -- Fiction | Knitting -- Fiction | Friendship -- Fiction | England -- FictionGenre/Form: Humorous fiction.DDC classification: 823/.92 Summary: When her husband dies in a car crash--not long after announcing he wants a divorce--Jo Mackenzie packs up her two rowdy boys and moves from London to a dilapidated villa in her seaside hometown where she takes over her beloved Gran's knitting shop. After a rough beginning, Jo soon finds comfort in a "Stitch and Bitch" group--a collection of quirky, lively women who share their stories, and their addiction to cake, with warmth and humor.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

For every woman who has ever dreamed of starting over, or being a better mother, or just knitting a really nice scarf . . .

When her husband dies in a car crash -- not long after announcing he wants a divorce -- Jo Mackenzie packs up her two rowdy boys and moves from London to a dilapidated villa in her seaside hometown. There, she takes over her beloved Gran's knitting shop -- a quaint but out-of-date store in desperate need of a facelift. After a rough beginning, Jo soon finds comfort in a "Stitch and Bitch" group; a collection of quirky, lively women who share their stories, and their addiction to cake, with warmth and humor.

As Jo starts to get the hang of single-parent life in a small town, she relies on her knitting group for support. The women meet every week at the shop on Beach Street and trade gossip and advice as freely as they do a new stitch. But when a new man enters Jo's life, and an A-list actress moves into the local mansion, the knitting club has even more trouble confining the conversation to knit one, purl two.

The Beach Street Knitting Society and Yarn Club is an uplifting, winning tale about the healing power of friendship and new beginnings. It's a charming novel that will delight all passionate knitters -- and win over befuddled, would-be knitters, too.

First published in Great Britain as Divas don't knit in 2007 by Bloomsbury.

When her husband dies in a car crash--not long after announcing he wants a divorce--Jo Mackenzie packs up her two rowdy boys and moves from London to a dilapidated villa in her seaside hometown where she takes over her beloved Gran's knitting shop. After a rough beginning, Jo soon finds comfort in a "Stitch and Bitch" group--a collection of quirky, lively women who share their stories, and their addiction to cake, with warmth and humor.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

After her husband death's in a car crash, Jo Mackenzie packs up her two sons and moves from London back to her hometown to run a knitting shop. Her ideas to revitalize the shop bring in a variety of new customers and with them an assortment of problems, complications, and eventual friendships. Unfortunately, Jo's two young boys, Archie and Jack, have to be the most obnoxiously ghastly children on the planet; many readers will have to resist the urge to stab the little darlings with knitting needles. Readers will also have to deal with a bit of English slang, but for many this will only make the story more charming. There's really nothing new here, but it's still a pleasant read that will fit into the women's fiction niche quite nicely. In light of the current popularity of needle arts, especially knitting, McNeil's debut will quickly find an audience. Recommended for any public library.-Margaret Hanes, Warren Civic Ctr. Lib., MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Smart novels about starting over don't get any better than this sweet treat by Brit author McNeil (Divas Don't Knit). Jo Mackenzie, full-time mum to little rascals Jack and Archie, is blindsided when her foreign correspondent husband, Nick, admits to an affair and asks for a divorce, only to be killed soon after in a car crash. Now Jo must keep up an awkward grieving widow facade. When her grandmother offers Jo the family knit shop, Jo sells her London flat and moves to the small seaside town of Broadgate Bay. When she decides to start a "stitch and bitch" group above her shop, the ancient shop assistant resists her innovations, but happily, the woman's son, Martin, is back in town and newly divorced. Then a chance encounter with a movie star, the town's newest resident, adds to Jo's misadventures. Readers will be kept in stitches by the mishaps and antics of Jo, an endearing Bridget Jones with baggage. McNeil's top-notch writing and quick wit keep the plot spinning until the wholly satisfying, and not entirely expected, conclusion. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Booklist Review

On the heels of the success of The Friday Night Knitting Club (2007) and its sequel, Knit Two (2008), British author McNeil crosses the pond with this charming tale of a woman who moves to a small English town to take over her grandmother's knitting shop. Jo MacKenzie's husband, Nick, was killed in a car accident just after telling Jo he was leaving her. Saddled with a second mortgage and two young boys to raise, Jo makes the decision to pack up and move to the seaside town where her grandmother lives. In the hopes of giving her grandmother's knitting shop a fresh feel, Jo renames the shop McKnits and sets up a Stitch & Bitch group for local ladies. She also gets a surprising new client: a pregnant A-list actress. More about Jo and her efforts to build a new life for herself and her sons than about the knitting group, McNeil's latest is a bit slow at times, but it nonetheless offers an appealing portrait of a woman starting over.--Huntley, Kristine Copyright 2009 Booklist