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Skulduggery Pleasant [sound recording (audio book)] / Derek Landy ; read by Rupert Degas.

By: Landy, Derek.
Contributor(s): Degas, Rupert.
Material type: materialTypeLabelSoundSeries: Landy, Derek. Skulduggery Pleasant: 01.; Landy, Derek. Skulduggery Pleasant: 1.; Landy, Derek. Skulduggery Pleasant: bk. 1.Publisher: London : HarperCollins AudioBooks, c2007Description: 6 audio discs (CD) (approximately 7 hrs., 30 min.) : digital, stereo. ; 4 3/4 in. in container.Content type: spoken word Media type: audio Carrier type: audio discISBN: 9780007254453.Subject(s): Papa -- Teenage fiction | Talking books for children | Children's stories -- Juvenile sound recordings | Magic -- Juvenile fiction | Magic -- Fiction | Wizards -- Teenage fiction | Magic -- Teenage fiction | Uncles -- Teenage fictionGenre/Form: Children's audiobooks. | Fantasy fiction. | Teenage horror fiction. | Teenage fantasy fiction. | Teenage audiobooks. | Teen fiction.
Contents:
6 DISCS So you won't keep anything from me again? He put his hand to his chest. Cross my heart and hope to die. Okay then. Though you don't actually have a heart, she said. I know. And technically, you've already died. I know that too. Just so we're clear. Stephanie's uncle Gordon is a writer of horror fiction. But when he dies and leaves her his estate, Stephanie learns that while he may have written horror, it certainly wasn't fiction. Pursued by evil forces intent on recovering a mysterious key, Stephanie finds help from an unusual source -- the wisecracking skeleton of a dead wizard. When all hell breaks loose, it's lucky for Skulduggery that he's already dead. Though he's about to discover that being a skeleton doesn't stop you from being tortured, if the torturer is determined enough. And if there's anything Skulduggery hates, it's torture! Will evil win the day? Will Stephanie and Skulduggery stop bickering long enough to stop it? One thing's for sure: evil won't know what's hit it.
Read by Rupert Degas.Subject: When twelve-year-old Stephanie inherits her weird uncle's estate, she must join forces with Skulduggery Pleasant, a skeleton mage, to save the world from the Faceless Ones.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Childrens Talking Books Davis (Central) Library
Children's Talking Books
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Get ready for the biggest NEW publishing phenomena of 2007! "So you won't keep anything from me again?"He put his hand to his chest. "Cross my heart and hope to die.""Okay then. Though you don't actually have a heart," she said."I know.""And technically, you've already died.""I know that too.""Just so we're clear." Stephanie's uncle Gordon is a writer of horror fiction. But when he dies and leaves her his estate, Stephanie learns that while he may have written horror, it certainly wasn't fiction. Pursued by evil forces intent on recovering a mysterious key, Stephanie finds help from an unusual source - the wisecracking skeleton of a dead wizard. When all hell breaks loose, it's lucky for Skulduggery that he's already dead. Though he's about to discover that being a skeleton doesn't stop you from being tortured, if the torturer is determined enough. And if there's anything Skulduggery hates, it's torture... Will evil win the day? Will Stephanie and Skulduggery stop bickering long enough to stop it? One thing's for sure: evil won't know what's hit it.

Unabridged.

Bonus feature: "Skulduggery Q & A" -- Cover.

6 DISCS So you won't keep anything from me again? He put his hand to his chest. Cross my heart and hope to die. Okay then. Though you don't actually have a heart, she said. I know. And technically, you've already died. I know that too. Just so we're clear. Stephanie's uncle Gordon is a writer of horror fiction. But when he dies and leaves her his estate, Stephanie learns that while he may have written horror, it certainly wasn't fiction. Pursued by evil forces intent on recovering a mysterious key, Stephanie finds help from an unusual source -- the wisecracking skeleton of a dead wizard. When all hell breaks loose, it's lucky for Skulduggery that he's already dead. Though he's about to discover that being a skeleton doesn't stop you from being tortured, if the torturer is determined enough. And if there's anything Skulduggery hates, it's torture! Will evil win the day? Will Stephanie and Skulduggery stop bickering long enough to stop it? One thing's for sure: evil won't know what's hit it.

Read by Rupert Degas.

When twelve-year-old Stephanie inherits her weird uncle's estate, she must join forces with Skulduggery Pleasant, a skeleton mage, to save the world from the Faceless Ones.

Compact discs [CD].

5 11 27 68 89 94 109 114 115 151 161 164 175

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

Skulduggery Pleasant Chapter One Stephanie Gordon Edgley's sudden death came as a shock to everyone--not least himself. One moment he was in his study, seven words into the twenty-fifth sentence of the final chapter of his new book, And the Darkness Rained upon Them , and the next he was dead. A tragic loss , his mind echoed numbly as he slipped away. The funeral was attended by family and acquaintances but not many friends. Gordon hadn't been a well-liked figure in the publishing world, for although the books he wrote--tales of horror and magic and wonder--regularly reared their heads in the bestseller lists, he had the disquieting habit of insulting people without realizing it, then laughing at their shock. It was at Gordon's funeral, however, that Stephanie Edgley first caught sight of the gentleman in the tan overcoat. He was standing under the shade of a large tree, away from the crowd, the coat buttoned up all the way despite the warmth of the afternoon. A scarf was wrapped around the lower half of his face, and even from her position on the far side of the grave, Stephanie could make out the wild and frizzy hair that escaped from the wide-brimmed hat he wore low over his gigantic sunglasses. She watched him, intrigued by his appearance. And then, like he knew he was being observed, he turned and walked back through the rows of headstones and disappeared from sight. After the service, Stephanie and her parents traveled back to her dead uncle's house, over a humpbacked bridge and along a narrow road that carved its way through thick woodland. The gates were heavy and grand and stood open, welcoming them into the estate. The grounds were vast, and the old house itself was ridiculously big. There was an extra door in the living room, a door disguised as a bookcase, and when she was younger Stephanie liked to think that no one else knew about this door, not even Gordon himself. It was a secret passageway, like in the stories she'd read, and she'd make up adventures about haunted houses and smuggled treasures. This secret passageway would always be her escape route, and the imaginary villains in these adventures would be dumbfounded by her sudden and mysterious dis-appearance. But now this door, this secret passageway, stood open, and there was a steady stream of people through it, and she was saddened that this little piece of magic had been taken from her. Tea was served and drinks were poured and little sandwiches were passed around on silver trays, and Stephanie watched the mourners casually ap-praise their surroundings. The major topic of hushed conversation was the will. Gordon wasn't a man who doted, or even demonstrated any great affec-tion, so no one could predict who would inherit his substantial fortune. Stephanie could see the greed seep into the watery eyes of her father's other brother, a horrible little man called Fergus, as he nodded sadly and spoke somberly and pocketed the silverware when he thought no one was looking. Fergus's wife was a thoroughly dislikable, sharp-featured woman named Beryl. She drifted through the crowd, deep in unconvincing grief, prying for gossip and digging for scandal. Her daughters did their best to ignore Stephanie. Carol and Crystal were twins, fifteen years old and as sour and vindictive as their parents. Whereas Stephanie was dark haired, tall, slim, and strong, they were bottle blond, stumpy, and dressed in clothes that made them bulge in all the wrong places. Apart from their brown eyes, no one would have guessed that the twins were related to her. She liked that. It was the only thing about them she liked. She left them to their petty glares and snide whispers, and went for a walk. The corridors of her uncle's house were long and lined with paintings. The floor beneath her feet was wooden, polished to a gleam, and the house smelled of age. Not musty, exactly, but . . . experienced. These walls and these floors had seen a lot in their time, and Stephanie was nothing but a faint whisper to them. Here one instant, gone the next. Gordon had been a good uncle. Arrogant and irresponsible, yes, but also childish and enormous fun, with a light in his eyes, a glint of mischief. When everyone else was taking him seriously, Stephanie was privy to the winks and the nods and the half smiles that he would shoot her way when they weren't looking. Even as a child, she'd felt she understood him better than most. She liked his intelligence, and his wit, and the way he didn't care what people thought of him. He'd been a good uncle to have. He'd taught her a lot. She knew that her mother and Gordon had briefly dated ("courted," her mother called it), but when Gordon had introduced her to his younger brother, it was love at first sight. Gordon liked to grumble that he had never gotten more than a peck on the cheek, but he had stepped aside graciously, and had quite happily gone on to have numerous torrid affairs with numerous beautiful women. He used to say that it had almost been a fair trade, but that he suspected he had lost out. She climbed the staircase to the first floor, pushed open the door to Gordon's study, and stepped inside. The walls were filled with the framed covers from his bestsellers. They shared space with all manner of awards. One entire wall was made up of shelves jammed with books. There were biographies and historical novels and science texts and psychology tomes, and there were battered little paperbacks stuck in between. A lower shelf had magazines, literary reviews, and quarterlies. She passed the shelves that housed first editions of Gordon's novels and approached the desk. She looked at the chair where he'd died, trying to imagine him there, how he must have slumped. And then a voice so smooth, it could have been made of velvet. Skulduggery Pleasant . Copyright © by Derek Landy . Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold. Excerpted from The Faceless Ones by Derek Landy All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Skulduggery Pleasant is the adopted name of a powerful detective mage who is sworn to protect Stephanie, the 12-year-old niece of his murdered friend. Here, skulduggery takes a double meaning-our detective is capable of scurrilous behavior in the pursuit of his suspects, and he's also a skeleton, robbed of his flesh by an age-old spell. Listen Up: Skulduggery's droll bass is a delight, and the cool-cat jazz on the soundtrack is an added bonus for grown-ups hip enough to know a groovy story when they hear one. Degas has a wonderful time building this story's suspense and conveying its dry humor.-Angelina Benedetti, King Cty. Lib. Syst., WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 8-Bernie Libster translated into English and tells these seven stories written by Italian author Gianni Rodari (1920-1980), who was awarded the Hans Christian Andersen Prize for children's literature in 1970. Libster's goal is to make Rodari's legacy of stories as well known in the U.S. as they are in Europe, Russia, and Asia. "The Little Mermaid" is adopted by a human family and becomes well known for her storytelling. "The Young Shrimp" prefers walking forward to walking backward. "The Man Who Stole the Coliseum"" believes that structure belongs to him, and begins carrying bits and pieces of it to his home every day. "A Violet at the North Pole" brings a bit of color and perfume to the area's starkness. "Tonino the Invisible" finds that invisibility is not everything he had hoped it would be. "Tiny Teresa, the Girl Who Refused to Grow" is so upset that her father was killed in a war that she decides she will never grow up, and she doesn't, until circumstances force her to change her mind. The accountant in "The Accountant and the Wind" learns when to hold himself down with bricks, and when to fly free. Libster makes each character unique with his deep, velvety, expressive voice. These whimsical tales can be enjoyed by the entire family.-Beverly Bixler, San Antonio Public Library, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Twelve-year-old Stephanie Edgley inherits her uncle Gordon's estate and is promptly attacked on her first solo visit to the property. A mysterious skeleton-detective, Skulduggery Pleasant, comes to her rescue, explaining that he thinks Gordon was murdered and that she may be next. The two join forces and set off to solve the crime in a series of magical adventures that take them into a world filled with ancient evil creatures, including Nefarian Serpine, who seeks the Scepter of the Ancients and the infinite power it will bring him. Landy, whose previous writing credits include horror screenplays, keeps the action brisk, his characters slightly macabre, and uses humor to take the edge off the violence. The story line is intricate (with numerous plot twists and switches in allegiance), and although her actions seem better suited to a somewhat older girl, Stephanie is a well-developed main character. The level of violence may disturb younger readers, however. This is recommended for larger collections where demand for horror/fantasy is high. --Kay Weisman Copyright 2007 Booklist

Horn Book Review

(Intermediate, Middle School) When Stephanie's beloved uncle Gordon, an author of ""tales of horror and magic and wonder,"" dies suddenly, Stephanie is the unexpected inheritor of his estate. It is soon apparent that Gordon was in possession of an unstoppable ancient weapon constructed to defeat unstoppable ancient gods called the Faceless Ones. The only things now standing between that weapon and an evil sorcerer are Stephanie, Gordon's best friend Skulduggery Pleasant (a living -- sort of -- magic skeleton), and Skulduggery's dubious collection of allies. Stephanie, the adventure-bent twelve-year-old heroine with an improbable aptitude for magic and martial arts, is a walking fantasy stereotype (as are her Dursley-like relatives and excessively oblivious parents), and though Skulduggery is given a tragic history and a supposed thirst for revenge, his past never comes into play, either in his relationship with Stephanie or in the larger magical-political conflict. Still, the convenience-ridden plot is elevated somewhat by Stephanie and Skulduggery's snappy banter, and the flowing action sequences, detailed mythology, and frequent twists will keep readers engaged. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.