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Lizzie zipmouth / Jacqueline Wilson ; illustrated by Nick Sharratt ; read by Sophie Aldred.

By: Wilson, Jacqueline.
Contributor(s): Sharratt, Nick | Aldred, Sophie | Sharratt, Nick illus.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Young Corgi, 2009Description: 78 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm. + 1 Compact disc.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780552560627(pbk).Subject(s): Stepfamilies -- Juvenile fiction | Great-grandmothers -- Juvenile fiction | Obstinacy -- Juvenile fiction | Families -- Juvenile fictionGenre/Form: Children's stories.DDC classification:
Contents:
Originally published: 2000.
Awards: Smarties Gold AwardRead by Sophie Aldred.Summary: Lizzie refuses to speak to her new stepbrothers, their dad, or even her mum. She's totally fed up at having to join a new family and nothing can coax her into speaking to them. That is, until she meets a member of the new family who is even more stubborn than she is. Suggested level: primary.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Lizzie isn't speaking to her new stepfamily -- she's a stubborn zipmouth -- until she meets a member of the new family who is even more determined than she is.

In this short, lively novel from mega-selling author, Jacqueline Wilson, Lizzie has zipped up her mouth. She's totally fed up at having to join a new family and nothing can coax her into speaking to them. Not football, not pizza, not a new bedroom. That is, until she meets Great-Gran, who is even more stubborn than her -- and has had a lot more practice.

Originally published: 2000.

Originally published: 2000.

Read by Sophie Aldred.

Lizzie refuses to speak to her new stepbrothers, their dad, or even her mum. She's totally fed up at having to join a new family and nothing can coax her into speaking to them. That is, until she meets a member of the new family who is even more stubborn than she is. Suggested level: primary.

Smarties Gold Award

6 9 11 89 96 98 175

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

Chapter One Do you ever have nightmares? I had such a scary dream I didn't want to go back to sleep. It was just starting to get light. I sat up in bed and looked at Mum. Her hair was spread out over the pillow. I wish I had lovely long hair like Mum. Sometimes she lets me brush and comb it. I can do it in a funny topknot. Once I put it in plaits and Mum looked just like my sister, not my mum. I haven't got a real sister. Or a real brother. But today I was getting two new sort-of brothers, Rory and Jake. I didn't like them much. I was getting a stepdad too. He was called Sam. I didn't call him anything. I didn't like him at all. I frowned at my mum. I took hold of a little clump of her hair and pulled. "Ouch! What are you up to, Lizzie?" said Mum, opening one eye. "I was just waking you up," I said. "It's too early to wake up," said Mum, putting her arm round me. "Let's snuggle down and have a snooze." "I don't want to snuggle," I said, wriggling away. "Mum, why do we have to move in with Sam?" Mum sighed. "Because I love him." "I don't love him," I said. "You might one day," said Mum. "Never ever," I said. "You wait and see," said Mum. "I think you're going to love being part of a big family. You and me and Sam and Rory and Jake." "I don't want to be a big family," I said. "I want to be a little family. Just you and me in our own flat." We had fun together, Mum and me. We went to football matches and we shared big tubs of ice-cream and we danced to music. Sometimes I stayed up really late and then we went to bed together. I didn't like night-time because of the bad dreams. I dreamt about my first stepdad. I hate stepdads. I've got a real dad but I don't see him now. He stopped living with us ages ago. He doesn't come to see me but I don't care any more. My first stepdad doesn't come to see us either and I'm very, very glad about that. He was a scary monster stepdad. He pretended to be jolly and friendly at first. He bought me heaps of presents. He even bought me a Flying Barbie. I always badly wanted a Barbie doll but Mum never bought me one. She thinks they're too girly. I like girly things. I loved my Flying Barbie but I didn't ever love my first stepdad, even at the beginning. When we went to live with him he was still jolly and friendly when he was in a good mood but he started to get lots of bad moods. He started shouting at me. I tried shouting back and he smacked me. He said I got on his nerves. He certainly got on my nerves. He said he didn't like me. I didn't like him one bit. Mum didn't like him any more either, especially when he shouted at me. We left that stepdad. We went back to being just Mum and me. We got our own flat. It was very small and poky and the bathroom had black mould and the heating didn't work, but it didn't matter. We were safe again, Mum and me. But then Mum met this man, Sam, in a sandwich bar. They ate lots and lots of sandwiches. Then they started going out together. Then I had to start going out with them at weekends even though I didn't want to. Sam's sons, Rory and Jake, came too. They didn't see their mum any more. They seemed to like my mum. But I didn't like their dad. * "I don't want Sam to be my stepdad," I said. Again. "He's not a bit like the last one, Lizzie, I promise," said Mum. I love my mum but I don't always believe her, even when she promises. "Lizzie?" said Mum. "Oh come on, don't look like that. Don't we have fun together when we all go out, the five of us?" Mum had fun. She larked about with Sam and sang silly songs and talked all the time and held his hand. Sam had fun. He la Excerpted from Lizzie Zipmouth by Jacqueline Wilson All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-5-Lizzie Zipmouth gets her name when she refuses to speak to anyone after her mother remarries in this novel by Jacqueline Wilson. She especially doesn't want to talk to her new father, Sam, or her new step-brothers, Rory and Jake. Lizzie is afraid of the changes in her life, and very concerned that the good times won't last. She stops speaking to punish her mother and as a test for her stepfather. Everything begins to change when Lizzie meets her new step-great-grandmother and her doll collection. The story is engaging and the characters are realistically drawn. British actress Sophie Aldred does a superb job as narrator. The Briticisms might be distracting to young listeners, although they are not essential to the plot. Those who can ignore this minor problem will enjoy a well-told tale about a young girl discovering herself and her new family-Saleena Davidson, South Brunswick Public Library, Monmouth Junction, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.