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Scrivener's moon / Philip Reeve.

By: Reeve, Philip [author].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Mortal engines ; 7.Reeve, Philip. Hungry city chronicles: 7.; Reeve, Philip. Fever Crumb series: 3.Publisher: London : Scholastic, 2011Description: xviii, 374 pages : map ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781407121574; 140712157X.Subject(s): Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction | Engineers -- Juvenile fiction | Recluses -- Juvenile fiction | Flight -- Juvenile fiction | London (England) -- Juvenile fictionGenre/Form: Steampunk fiction. | Science fiction. | Young adult fiction. | Teen fiction. DDC classification: Summary: "The Scriven People are brilliant, mad - and dead. All except one, whose insane creation is nearly complete - a giant city on wheels."--Back cover.Summary: In a future land once known as Britain, nomad tribes are preparing to fight a terrifying enemy - the first-ever mobile city. Before London can launch itself, young engineer Fever Crumb must journey to the wastelands of the North. She seeks the ancient birthplace of the Scriven mutants. In the chaotic weeks before battle begins, Fever finds a mysterious black pyramid. The extradionary secrets it contains will change her world forever.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Childrens Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Children's Fiction
Children's Fiction REE 1 Available T00513992
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In a future land once known as Britain, nomad tribes are preparing a terrifying enemy - the first ever mobile city. Before London can launch itself, young engineer Fever Crumb must journey to the North. In the weeks before battle begins, Fever finds a mysterious black pyramid. The secrets it contains will change her world forever.

Seventh book in The world of mortal engines series.

Sequel to: A web of air.

"The Scriven People are brilliant, mad - and dead. All except one, whose insane creation is nearly complete - a giant city on wheels."--Back cover.

In a future land once known as Britain, nomad tribes are preparing to fight a terrifying enemy - the first-ever mobile city. Before London can launch itself, young engineer Fever Crumb must journey to the wastelands of the North. She seeks the ancient birthplace of the Scriven mutants. In the chaotic weeks before battle begins, Fever finds a mysterious black pyramid. The extradionary secrets it contains will change her world forever.

5 7 11 18 27 32 47 62 63 75 89 94 104 132 134 135 149 161 164

Kotui multi-version record.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">From Scrivener's Moon "No!" he shouted. They both shouted it, him and the girl in the mirror, but the only voice he heard was hers. "I am Auric Godshawk! I am Godshawk!" But he wasn't. Godshawk had died a long time ago. What remained of him was just a ghost inhabiting the mind of this thin girl, his granddaughter. Her name, he suddenly recalled, was Fever Crumb. And once he knew that, he could not stay. These thin young hands were not his hands; these eyes were not his eyes; this world was not his world anymore. With a terrible sadness he let himself be folded down, like an immense and wonderful map being crumpled into an impossibly small ball, and packed away into the tiny machine that he had once planted, like a silver seed, among the roots of Fever's brain. With his last thought as he left her, he wondered what had brought her here alone into the north-country with an arrow through her. Excerpted from Scrivener's Moon - Audio by Philip Reeve All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-9-In the last book (2012) in Reeve's trilogy, Fever Crumb's life continues without the influence of the totally rational engineers. She recognizes and begins to embrace her humanity. As New London continues its path toward hungry mobility (which starts the "Mortal Engines" series), Fever travels north with her mother to ascertain the truth about the rumors concerning a power source. Fever's story becomes entwined with those of Charlie Shallow and Cluny Morvish. Charlie is a conniving, murderous boy who has risen to power and prestige and will stop at nothing to retain his position. Cluny, a prophet from the North, is more like Fever than either initially realizes. British actress Sarah Coomes's reading makes the fast-paced story come alive, and her accents from different parts of England are effective in not only differentiating characters but also in highlighting class distinctions. The dramatic, breathtaking, and often violent plot is well paced and effective though more sophisticated thematically and in content than the earlier offerings. Listeners must be familiar with the back story from the previous two titles, so this is only for fans of Fever Crumb and Web Air (2011, all Scholastic).-Maria Salvadore, formerly Washington DC Public Library (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Horn Book Review

In this third book (Fever Crumb, rev. 3/10; A Web of Air, rev. 9/11) set in a post-apocalyptic, post-technological Britain, the hyperrational Fever (part human, part nanomachinery-enhanced hybrid-human Scrivener) is back in London as preparations, led by Fever's engineer mother Wavey, are underway to transform London into the first mobile city. Rumors of a mysterious black pyramid that may hold secrets of much-needed Ancient technology send Wavey and Fever on a perilous mission north. Characterization is deep and revelatory; themes are rich and seamlessly interwoven; and the plot is complex and packed with propulsive action. Suffice it to say that Fever experiences great loss and also finds unexpected connections on her journey through the barbarous north. Readers of the previous Fever Crumb titles may be forgiven for losing themselves in her adventures and forgetting that they are prequels to Reeve's Predator Cities quartet. But with Scrivener's Moon there's no doubt: it culminates in the brutal and spectacular birth of a mobile London (followed by an epic battle) and thus of the rapacious Traction Era so brilliantly evoked in Mortal Engines (rev. 11/03) and sequels. As for Fever Crumb, she forges a life for herself well outside of what now passes for civilization; although the well-earned ending feels final, readers will have to see whether or not Reeve leaves her in peace. martha v. parravano (c) Copyright 2013. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

The third (and final?) Fever Crumb story reminds readers of the serious themes beneath Reeve's often madcap, always entertaining tales. Following the events of A Web of Air (2011), a subdued Fever has returned to London. It's not long before she heads north with her mother, following rumors that a mysterious structure that may hold the key to Stalker brains has been breached. Meanwhile, London nears the mobility it will enjoy years into the future (Mortal Engines, 2003, etc.), but the northern nomads are ready to challenge London based on a young girl's prophetic dreams. Whew! Beneath the plot run three narratives: of Fever, discovering the truth about the Scriven and her own humanity; of Cluny Morvish, reluctant prophet and, it turns out, another of Godshawk's experiments; and of Charley Shallow, who once tried to kill Fever and is now an upstanding young sociopath who pulls a lot of strings. There are few truly happy moments here, and lots of violence, but the rich worldbuilding continues to hold surprises, and the writing never falters. Most hopeful--although perhaps unexpected--is a possible romance for Fever; the not-fully-resolved ending leaves hope that the feelings might be reciprocated. The implication that only away from London and science can Fever find happiness echoes the themes and tensions between technology and nature Reeve has explored throughout this and the Hungry Cities quartet. Quiet and somber, but still deeply satisfying. (Steampunk. 13 up)]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.