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Ship of Rome / by John Stack.

By: Stack, John, 1972-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Stack, John. Masters of the sea: bk. 1.; Stack, John. Masters of the sea: 1.; Stack, John. Masters of the sea: 01.; Stack, John. Masters of the sea: ; Masters of the sea: bk. 1Publisher: London : HarperCollins, 2009Description: 362 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780007294527 (pbk.).Subject(s): Naval art and science -- Italy -- Rome -- History -- Fiction | Punic wars -- Fiction | Sea stories | Rome (Italy) -- History, Naval -- Fiction | Carthage (Extinct city) -- History, Naval -- Fiction | Carthage (Extinct city) -- FictionGenre/Form: Sea stories. | Historical fiction. | Sea fiction. | War stories.DDC classification: Free Fiction
Contents:
Against a backdrop of the clash of the Roman and Carthaginian empires, the battle for sovreignity takes place on the high seas This exciting new series from a first time novelist stars an outsider - a Greek master mariner - as the hero, and the story is set against the backdrop of a clash of empires Roman and Carthaginian. Ship of Rome is set in the earlier period of Rome when the empire was not nearly as well established and when the Romans were challenged for their control of Southern Italy and Sicily by the powerful trading nation of Carthage. The Carthaginians have the advantage in their control of the seas by their impressive navy while the Romans had few shipd and even fewer sea-going fighting captains. Atticus, son of a modest fishing family starts as the captain of a small ship protecting the harbours and shores of Suthern Italy from pirates. Surpirsed by a large Carthaginian fleet, he creats a brilliant victory and alerts the Roman legions nearby. His success results in his being instrumental in the creation of a Roman navy. However, because he is from a Greek colony, Atticus is often made to feel inferior - a second class citizen. He has a complex relationship with the Roman legionaries abord his ship, and with the Senators who control operations. The story is told from the point of view of several characters, both real and fictional, Roman and Carthaginian, politician and sailor. Though both are mighty Empires, the ambitions and ethos of Rome and Carthage are completely different and fascinating. The Sea battles are magnificent, the detail of the ships, the tactics and strategies, and the descriptions of life on bord are completely convincing and very interesting.
Subject: Against a backdrop of the clash of the Roman and Carthaginian empires, the battle for sovreignty takes place on the high seas.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Against a backdrop of the clash of the Roman and Carthaginian empires, the battle for sovreignity takes place on the high seas

Against a backdrop of the clash of the Roman and Carthaginian empires, the battle for sovreignity takes place on the high seas This exciting new series from a first time novelist stars an outsider - a Greek master mariner - as the hero, and the story is set against the backdrop of a clash of empires Roman and Carthaginian. Ship of Rome is set in the earlier period of Rome when the empire was not nearly as well established and when the Romans were challenged for their control of Southern Italy and Sicily by the powerful trading nation of Carthage. The Carthaginians have the advantage in their control of the seas by their impressive navy while the Romans had few shipd and even fewer sea-going fighting captains. Atticus, son of a modest fishing family starts as the captain of a small ship protecting the harbours and shores of Suthern Italy from pirates. Surpirsed by a large Carthaginian fleet, he creats a brilliant victory and alerts the Roman legions nearby. His success results in his being instrumental in the creation of a Roman navy. However, because he is from a Greek colony, Atticus is often made to feel inferior - a second class citizen. He has a complex relationship with the Roman legionaries abord his ship, and with the Senators who control operations. The story is told from the point of view of several characters, both real and fictional, Roman and Carthaginian, politician and sailor. Though both are mighty Empires, the ambitions and ethos of Rome and Carthage are completely different and fascinating. The Sea battles are magnificent, the detail of the ships, the tactics and strategies, and the descriptions of life on bord are completely convincing and very interesting.

Against a backdrop of the clash of the Roman and Carthaginian empires, the battle for sovreignty takes place on the high seas.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

In this historically accurate debut, Stack vividly recreates the Roman Republic and its first attempts at a Roman navy. Capt. Atticus Perennis is a Roman of Greek ancestry and master of the trireme Aquila. Septimus Capito is one of the first marine Centurions. The two brothers-in-arms must confront both the vagaries of the Senate, with its backstabbing, self-aggrandizing politics, and the difficulties of developing the concept of naval warfare. Characteriza-tion tends to take a backseat to the abundant historical data, as Stack fills his stirring story brimming with the minutiae of Roman military life circa 200 B.C. and the strategic details of conducting battles at sea from slave-powered galleys, but fans of historical naval fiction will be thrilled by this exploration of an oft-ignored era. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved