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The time of the giants / Anne Kennedy.

By: Kennedy, Anne, 1959-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, N.Z. : Auckland University Press, 2005Description: 114 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1869403428 (pbk.).Subject(s): Poetry -- New Zealand | New Zealand poetry -- 21st centuryGenre/Form: New Zealand poetry -- 21st century. | New Zealand poetry -- 21st century.DDC classification: 821.9 Online resources: Contributor biographical information | Publisher description
Contents:
Rain, drum -- Boy girl, furniture, shyness -- Genealogy, headland -- Books, pastries : and dances -- Man, moss -- Plateau in, you know moonlight -- Cinema, the sad ending 'o' -- Off-ramps, oh God oh God -- Autumn, the ache called nothing -- Love (declaration of), fire -- His place, noon and night -- Idyll, violin -- Changing shed, bloodshed -- Sky its blue, or green -- Die die, live live -- Round tower (height of) -- Children, headland -- E.g., causeway.
Rain, drum -- Boy girl, furniture, shyness -- Genealogy, headland -- Books, pastries : and dances -- Man, moss -- Plateau in, you know moonlight -- Cinema, the sad ending 'o' -- Off-ramps, oh God oh God -- Autumn, the ache called nothing -- Love (declaration of), fire -- His place, noon and night -- Idyll, violin -- Changing shed, bloodshed -- Sky its blue, or green -- Die die, live live -- Round tower (height of) -- Children, headland -- E.g., causeway.
Review: "This is a second unusual and beautiful sequence of poems by a writer whose work is always remarkable. This new work is much less tied to the poet's own experience and shows her characteristic love of story and the solidity of the imagined. Wonderfully inventive and both moving and amusing, it focuses on a family of giants and in particular the daughter, Moss, and her efforts to conceal from her lover just how tall she really is. Typical for Anne Kennedy, this tale also includes gentle satire on contemporary manners, witty language play and a warm and affectionate tone."--BOOK JACKET.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Affectionate yet satirical, this sequence of poems focuses on a family of giants and, in particular, on a young giant woman and her efforts to conceal from her normally sized lover how tall she truly is. The witty verses are infused with warmth and transcend a reader's everyday reality and experiences. As disturbing and fabulous as a classic fairy tale, this gathering of work showcases the fanciful aspects of contemporary manners.

Rain, drum -- Boy girl, furniture, shyness -- Genealogy, headland -- Books, pastries : and dances -- Man, moss -- Plateau in, you know moonlight -- Cinema, the sad ending 'o' -- Off-ramps, oh God oh God -- Autumn, the ache called nothing -- Love (declaration of), fire -- His place, noon and night -- Idyll, violin -- Changing shed, bloodshed -- Sky its blue, or green -- Die die, live live -- Round tower (height of) -- Children, headland -- E.g., causeway.

Rain, drum -- Boy girl, furniture, shyness -- Genealogy, headland -- Books, pastries : and dances -- Man, moss -- Plateau in, you know moonlight -- Cinema, the sad ending 'o' -- Off-ramps, oh God oh God -- Autumn, the ache called nothing -- Love (declaration of), fire -- His place, noon and night -- Idyll, violin -- Changing shed, bloodshed -- Sky its blue, or green -- Die die, live live -- Round tower (height of) -- Children, headland -- E.g., causeway.

"This is a second unusual and beautiful sequence of poems by a writer whose work is always remarkable. This new work is much less tied to the poet's own experience and shows her characteristic love of story and the solidity of the imagined. Wonderfully inventive and both moving and amusing, it focuses on a family of giants and in particular the daughter, Moss, and her efforts to conceal from her lover just how tall she really is. Typical for Anne Kennedy, this tale also includes gentle satire on contemporary manners, witty language play and a warm and affectionate tone."--BOOK JACKET.

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