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Math fables too : making science count / by Greg Tang ; illustrated by Taia Morley.

By: Tang, Greg.
Contributor(s): Morley, Taia [illustrator.] | Morley, Taia | Morley, Taia (Illustrator).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Making science count: Publisher: New York : Scholastic Press, 2007Edition: First edition.Description: 1 volumes (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0439783518; 9780439783514; 9780439783514 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0439783518 (hbk.).Subject(s): Counting -- Juvenile literature | Science -- Juvenile literature | Science fiction -- Juvenile literature | Animals -- Children's poetry | Conduct of life -- Juvenile literatureGenre/Form: Children's nonfiction.DDC classification: C513.211 Summary: More rhymes about animals that introduce counting and grouping numbers, as well as examples of such behaviors as cooperation, friendship, and appreciation.Summary: A series of rhymes about animals introduces counting and grouping numbers. Suggested level: junior.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Childrens Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Children's Non-fiction
Children's Non-fiction 513 TAN 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Greg Tang, a nationally acclaimed speaker, author, and educator, has already inspired hundreds of thousands of children, parents, and teachers across the country through his best-selling books. Now with this follow-up to his wildly successful Math Fables, Greg Tang adds science to the mix as he challenges the youngest math learners--kids ages three to six--to think about numbers in more creative ways. His charming animal fables will spark an interest in science while giving children a head start in math that will last a lifetime. Math, science, and "lessons that count"--a winning combination!

More rhymes about animals that introduce counting and grouping numbers, as well as examples of such behaviors as cooperation, friendship, and appreciation.

A series of rhymes about animals introduces counting and grouping numbers. Suggested level: junior.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-In this companion book to Math Fables (Scholastic, 2004), Tang offers 10 rhymes about animals that teach science concepts as well as basic arithmetic. In addition (no pun intended), each selection contains a moral, such as for the seahorse, "He's happy to be different-/it makes him more unique!" and for the herons, "They know the secret to success/is patience, smarts, and skill!" For number six, "Know Spitting" shows how the archerfish can aim at insects above the water and knock them into the water to catch their dinner. Then combinations of archerfish are shown in groups of five and one, four and two, and three and three. The author also encourages vocabulary growth by using words such as "din," "gorged," "physique," and "marsupials." The bright, bold computer-generated illustrations bring personality to the animals and create colorful displays for counting and adding. Further information about the animal highlighted in each rhyme is appended.-Sandra Welzenbach, Villarreal Elementary School, San Antonio, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

Anything but a one-trick pony, Tang offers not only math concepts in his latest collection of verse, but natural history, challenging vocabulary, wordplay and wisdom to boot. Going from one (male, pregnant) seahorse to ten seagulls, animals in each poem combine and recombine in different groupings to, usually, hunt--"1 bat flew off into the sky / to hear what he could find. / 6 others followed after him / a flap or two behind"--using natural attributes and, in several cases, tools, too. In Morley's brightly colored, artfully composed natural scenes, the animals are accurately rendered and their groups clearly differentiated; even younger children will have no trouble counting them and seeing how they add together. That the poems also have titles like "The Sound and the Furry," use words like "camouflaged" and end, as fables should, in Lessons ("All 6 were feeling quite content / with food enough for each. / They know that aiming high in life / leaves nothing out of reach!") adds enough nuance and content to reward any number of subsequent re-readings. A seamless blend of pleasure and purpose sandwiched between an introduction for adults and a closing page of recapitulated science facts. (Nonfiction poetry. 4-7) Copyright ┬ęKirkus Reviews, used with permission.