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Stories from the Billabong / retold by James Marshall ; illustrated by Francis Firebrace.

By: Marshall, James Vance, 1924-.
Contributor(s): Jones, Francis Firebrace.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Frances Lincoln Children's Books, 2008Description: 61 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781845077044 (hbk.); 1845077040 (hbk.).Subject(s): Tales -- Australia -- Juvenile literature | Folklore -- Australia -- Juvenile literature | Animals -- Folklore -- Juvenile literature | Aboriginal Australians -- Folklore -- Juvenile literature | Yorta Yorta (Australian people) -- Folklore | Mythology, Aboriginal Australian -- Juvenile literature | Legends -- Australia -- Juvenile literatureGenre/Form: Children's nonfiction.DDC classification: C398.2
Contents:
The rainbow serpent and the story of creation -- How the kangaroo got her pouch -- Why frogs can only croak -- Why Brolgas dance -- Why the platypus is such a speical creature -- The mountain rose -- The two moths and the flowers of the mountain -- How the crocodile got its scales -- The lizard-man and the creation of Uluru -- The butterflies and the mystery of death -- About Aboriginal Australians -- Glossary -- Aboriginal symbols and their meanings.
Summary: A collection of ancient Aboriginal legends of the Yarta-Yorta people retold. Suggested level: junior, primary, intermediate.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Childrens Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Children's Non-fiction
Children's Non-fiction 398.2 MAR 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From the author of Walkabout come ten of Australia's ancient aboriginal legends, authentically and elegantly retold. Here you can discover how Great Mother Snake created and peopled the world with plants and creatures, what makes Frogs croak, why Kangaroo has a pouch, and just what it is that makes Platypus so special. The illustrations are by the aboriginal artist and storyteller Francis Firebrace, whose distinctive, colourful work is known throughout Australia and beyond.

The rainbow serpent and the story of creation -- How the kangaroo got her pouch -- Why frogs can only croak -- Why Brolgas dance -- Why the platypus is such a speical creature -- The mountain rose -- The two moths and the flowers of the mountain -- How the crocodile got its scales -- The lizard-man and the creation of Uluru -- The butterflies and the mystery of death -- About Aboriginal Australians -- Glossary -- Aboriginal symbols and their meanings.

A collection of ancient Aboriginal legends of the Yarta-Yorta people retold. Suggested level: junior, primary, intermediate.

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Excerpt provided by Syndetics

The Rainbow Serpent and the Story of Creation In the beginning, there was no life on the surface of the Earth. But beneath the surface the Great Mother Snake, the Rainbow Serpent, lay asleep. She slept for a long, long time. Then one day she woke up, uncoiled herself, and crawled into the open. As she moved slowly over the flat, dry, empty land, she said to herself, "This isn't much of a place." So she used her magic to make rain. It rained day after day. Week after week. Month after month. Year after year. And after a while the tracks left by the body of the Rainbow Serpent filled with water. This is how the long winding rivers, the billabongs and the waterholes came into being. Sometimes, as the Rainbow Serpent moved forward, she pushed her nose into the Earth, and the soil piled up in front of her. This is how the mountains, the hills and the valleys came into being. In some places, the milk from her breasts soaked into the Earth and made it fertile. And here great rainforests sprang up, and all sorts of grasses, and carpets of bright-coloured flowers. When the Rainbow Serpent had made the land to her liking, she went back inside the Earth and woke the creatures who, like her, had been asleep there. Excerpted from Stories from the Billabong by James V. Marshall All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Starred Review. Gr 2-6-With the help of Aboriginal storytellers who have collected the tales and myths of their people, Marshall has assembled 10 fascinating stories of the Dreamtime. Many explain why some things are the way they are: "How the Kangaroo got her Pouch," "Why Frogs can only Croak," and "How the Crocodile got its Scales." Others tell about the creation of the Earth, death, and other universal concerns. Each selection is beautifully told and is illustrated by a traditional artist who uses the distinctive symbols and colors of the Aboriginal people. An informational page follows each retelling, giving readers facts about the subject. Concluding pages offer a brief explanation of who the Aboriginal Australians are and an illustrated spread that explains the symbols and their meanings. This is an engaging, colorful book that belongs in most libraries.-Lee Bock, Glenbrook Elementary School, Pulaski, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Ten Aboriginal stories relate how the world was created, why frogs croak, and other legends associated with various Australian wildlife. Each story runs a brief three pages in length, with an additional page of information about a prominent creature from the tale. The stories lack the tension, character, and precision that usually occurs with retelling and seem to be remembered pieces of longer stories. Back matter includes one page on Aboriginal culture, two pages on their symbols, and a glossary. Francis Firebrace's vibrant Aboriginal art outshines the stories, but the book may prove helpful in multicultural studies.--Perkins, Linda Copyright 2009 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

With the permission of Aboriginal storytellers hoping to keep their myths and legends alive, the reteller, most famous for his book Walkabout (1959), has created a collection of ten stories accompanied by information about the flora, fauna and land formations mentioned. The anthology includes stories about the origins of Uluru (once known as Ayers Rock), the kangaroo's pouch, the mountain rose and the scales of the crocodile. Next to the stories, the informational descriptions seem dry, but useful, with their measurements both in the metric system and English units. The glossary, two pages on Aboriginal symbols and a short afterword on the Aboriginal people are good additions to the book. Firebrace is from the Yorta-Yorta group, river people who lived near Victoria, and his paintings of the platypus and the crocodile are especially bold. His images swings from a more traditional Aboriginal style with vibrant colors and distinct, flattened shapes to a softer rendering of flowers and insects. Due to the oral transmission of the stories, no written sources are included. A welcome and important addition to folklore collections. (Folklore. 7-11) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.