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The rest of her life / Laura Moriarty.

By: Moriarty, Laura.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Crows Nest, N.S.W. : Allen & Unwin, 2007Description: 306 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781741752380 (pbk.) :.Subject(s): Mothers and daughters -- Fiction | Traffic accidents -- Psychological aspects -- Fiction | Accidents -- Fiction | Families -- Fiction | Wrongful death -- Fiction | Traffic accidents -- Fiction | Female friendship -- Fiction | Teenage girls -- Conduct of life -- FictionGenre/Form: Domestic fiction. | General fiction. DDC classification: Free Fiction Subject: Leigh is the mother of high-achieving, popular high school senior Kara. Their relationship is already strained for reasons Leigh does not fully understand when, in a moment of carelessness, Kara makes a mistake that ends in tragedy - the effects of which not only divide Leigh's family, but polarize the entire community. We see the story from Leigh's perspective, as she grapples with the hard reality of what her daughter has done and the devastating consequences her actions have on the family of another teenage girl in town, all while struggling to protect Kara in the face of rising public outcry. Like the best works of Jane Hamilton, Jodi Picoult, and Alice Sebold, Laura Moriarty's The Rest of Her Life is a novel of complex moral dilemma, filled with nuanced characters and a page-turning plot that makes readers ask themselves, "What would I do?"
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection MOR Reference Only T00458220
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A young girl and her family deal with the repercussions of a tragic car accident in this compelling tale of loss and guilt.

Leigh is the mother of high-achieving, popular high school senior Kara. Their relationship is already strained for reasons Leigh does not fully understand when, in a moment of carelessness, Kara makes a mistake that ends in tragedy - the effects of which not only divide Leigh's family, but polarize the entire community. We see the story from Leigh's perspective, as she grapples with the hard reality of what her daughter has done and the devastating consequences her actions have on the family of another teenage girl in town, all while struggling to protect Kara in the face of rising public outcry. Like the best works of Jane Hamilton, Jodi Picoult, and Alice Sebold, Laura Moriarty's The Rest of Her Life is a novel of complex moral dilemma, filled with nuanced characters and a page-turning plot that makes readers ask themselves, "What would I do?"

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

At the end of the school year, Leigh Churchill-wife, mother, and schoolteacher-comes home to a nightmare. Her family is huddled together in shock; 18-year-old Kara has just run over and killed another teenager. In a moment of catastrophic inattention, what "happens to someone else" has now become their headline. Moriarty spares her readers nothing, showing us that for anyone in this situation the agonizing process of getting from one moment to the next is overwhelming. The law, surprisingly light in this case, provides some relief for Kara and her family yet can offer no protection against the loss of familiar comforts. Friendships, reliable marriage, the family's place in the community, unrelenting guilt-all are thoroughly dissected under the harsh light of tragedy. Moriarty (The Center of Everything) is a blunt, honest scout. She strips away the detritus of deceit, leaving behind the unavoidable truth that follows such events-life never will be the same and only hard work may make it worth living. Strongly recommended.-Beth E. Andersen, Ann Arbor Dist. Lib., MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Moriarty's follow-up to book-group favorite The Center of Everything again explores a tense, fragile mother-daughter relationship, this time finding sharper edges where personal history and parenting meet. Now a junior high school English teacher married to a college professor, Leigh has spent much of her adult life trying to distance herself from her dysfunctional childhood. Raising their two children in a small, safe Kansas town not far from where Leigh and her troubled sister, Pam, were raised by their single mother, Leigh finds her good fortune still somewhat empty. Daughter Kara, 18 and a high school senior, is distant; sensitive younger son Justin is unpopular; Leigh can't seem to reach either-Kara in particular sees Leigh (rightly) as self-absorbed. When Kara accidentally hits and kills another high school girl with the family's car, Leigh is forced to confront her troubled relationship with her daughter, her resentment toward her husband (who understands Kara better) and her long-buried angst about her own neglectful mother. The intriguing supporting characters are limited by not-very-likable Leigh's POV, but Moriarty effectively conveys Leigh's longing for escape and wariness of reckoning. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Booklist Review

"Moriarty, author of The Center of  Everything (2003), limns the aftermath of a family tragedy.  Kara Churchill, 18, is driving with a friend and talking on her phone when she blows through a stop sign and strikes a classmate, killing her instantly. Kara retreats into herself, baffling and upsetting her mother, Leigh, who can't find a way to reach her. Leigh's own mother abandoned Leigh at age 16 when she abruptly took off for California to live her own life, and Leigh's sister has moved from one bad relationship to another, so there are reasons Leigh has difficulties relating to her privileged, popular daughter. Moriarty avoids the twists readers expect an outraged community and a lurid trial to focus instead on the internal workings of the Churchill family and their shock and grief in the days following the girl's death. Leigh in particular wonders how her daughter will move on beyond the accident that will haunt her for the remainder of her days. Powerful, original, and utterly absorbing, Moriarty's novel will stay with the reader long after the final page is turned."--"Huntley, Kristine" Copyright 2007 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Another novel of troubled mothers and daughters from Moriarty (The Center of Everything, 2003), whose straightforward, unadorned prose speaks on some level to every woman. Leigh and her older sister Pam came up the hard way, always the new kids at school in one nameless town after another because their divorced mother kept changing jobs. Left to fend for herself when Mom moved alone to California, Leigh struggled to make it through college. In addition to a degree in education, she also picked up Shakespearean grad student Gary. As the book opens, the couple lives in a small Kansas town; Gary teaches at the local university, Leigh at the middle school. Their daughter Kara, just about to graduate from high school and leave for college, is a golden girl who doesn't find it easy to relate to her mother. Younger child Justin, engaging but friendless, longs for acceptance from his peers. The middle-class family's seemingly golden life hits a bump in the road when Kara, driving home from school, accidentally strikes a fellow student in a pedestrian crossing and kills her. The small town that had seemed like a protective blanket suddenly becomes a city of eyes, watching and prying--or at least that's how the family perceives it. As Kara struggles with her conscience, Leigh finds herself unable to connect with her own daughter. She remembers her hardscrabble childhood and the mother she swore never to emulate. In this compelling story of female relationships--mothers, sisters, daughters and best friends--Moriarty's characters grab readers the minute they enter the story, and recollections of their vivid personalities will linger long after the last page. Well-written, convincing and impossible to put down. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.