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The double agents / W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV.

By: Griffin, W. E. B.
Contributor(s): Butterworth, William E. (William Edmund).
Material type: TextTextSeries: Griffin, W. E. B. Men at war: bk. 6.Men at war: 6.; Men at war series: 6.Publisher: New York : G. P. Putnam's Sons, c2007Description: 333 pages.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780399154201.Subject(s): United States. Office of Strategic Services -- Fiction | World War, 1939-1945 -- Secret service -- FictionGenre/Form: War stories. | Thrillers (Fiction) | War fiction. DDC classification: GRI Review: "Dick Canidy and his colleagues in the Office of Strategic Services face a great task - to convince Hitler and the Axis powers that the invasion of the European continent will take place anywhere but on the beaches of Nazi-occupied France. "Wild Bill" Donovan's men have several tactics in mind, but some of the people they must use are not the most reliable - are, in fact, most likely spying for both sides - so the deceptions require layer upon layer of intrigue, and all it will take is one slip to send the whole thing tumbling down like a house of cards. Are the OSS agents up to it? They certainly think so." "And then the body is found floating off the coast of Spain."--BOOK JACKET.
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Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection GRI 1 Available T00459154
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Griffin's iconoclastic OSS heroes face a historic challenge in the brand-new volume of the New York Times bestselling series that is filled to the brim with action and character.

"Dick Canidy and his colleagues in the Office of Strategic Services face a great task - to convince Hitler and the Axis powers that the invasion of the European continent will take place anywhere but on the beaches of Nazi-occupied France. "Wild Bill" Donovan's men have several tactics in mind, but some of the people they must use are not the most reliable - are, in fact, most likely spying for both sides - so the deceptions require layer upon layer of intrigue, and all it will take is one slip to send the whole thing tumbling down like a house of cards. Are the OSS agents up to it? They certainly think so." "And then the body is found floating off the coast of Spain."--BOOK JACKET.

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Sequel to: Saboteurs.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Griffin and son add to the "Men at War" series with this account of OSS struggles to fool Hitler into thinking that the Allies won't be coming through France when they invade Europe. With a national tour. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Actors David Niven and Peter Ustinov, along with James Bond creator Ian Fleming, all of whom actually served Britain in WWII, help the heroes of Griffin's Men at War series deceive the Germans in this solid sixth installment (after 2006's The Saboteurs) from the bestselling author and his son, Butterworth. In 1943, the OSS's William J. "Wild Bill" Donovan spearheads a disinformation effort to trick the Nazis into believing that the western Allies won't invade the European continent through Sicily. One of Donovan's most accomplished operatives, USAAF Maj. Richard Canidy, devises a clever scheme (albeit one familiar to readers of Ewen Montagu's The Man Who Never Was) to plant phony plans on a corpse, along with love letters drafted by the requisite attractive female spy. Some fans may find the prominent role of the real-life celebrities a distraction, but all will enjoy the suspenseful ride. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Booklist Review

"The Men at War series continues with this typically exciting adventure. The plucky, resourceful agents of the Office of Strategic Services face what could be their toughest assignment: to convince Adolf Hitler that the Allied invasion of Europe will not take place at Normandy. This is the second novel Griffin has cowritten with his son, but it retains all of the veteran author's trademarks: well-researched plot; realistic characters, real and fictional; and snappy dialogue. How Griffin manages to turn out so many novels without resorting to by-the-numbers plotting and cutout characters is a mystery, but as long as he keeps delivering the goods, his legions of fans will be content."--"Pitt, David" Copyright 2007 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Griffin (The Hunters, 2007, etc.), with Butterworth, continues his Men at War World War II spy series, sending proto-CIA agent Major Richard Canidy to check on Nazi supplies of nerve gas secreted in Sicily. As we know now, there was no limit to Nazi perfidy, but Canidy and his O.S.S. bosses are shocked to discover evidence of chemical and biological weapons on the weakening Axis stronghold of Sicily. Good-guy saboteurs did their best to blow up a ship full of nerve gas and a palazzo loaded with germs, but Canidy needs to go back to the island to double check on the job. If the gas went off in the explosion, there will be corpses clogging the streets, making it necessary for President Roosevelt to react. Before Canidy can return to Sicily, he has to involve himself in the O.S.S. training effort in Algeria, selecting a team from Italian-American student agents whose loyalty, given the possibility of Mafia ties, cannot be guaranteed. Real-life film stars Peter Ustinov and David Niven, with author Ian Fleming, turn up in a secondary plot taking quite as much time as the nerve gas business. The stellar trio expend much energy on the creation of a backstory for a corpse the Brits have frozen and plan to use in an elaborate ruse to make the Axis powers believe that the Allies will invade the Balkans instead of Sicily. The boys toss off Griffin's idea of bons mots, thrilling Philadelphia debutante Charity Hoche, a mid-level character who starts to hog the stage, and who at one point has a confusing run-in with the metric system a generation before it was adopted in the U.K. Heavy-handed writing manages to make David Niven sound like a bore in this undistinguished addition to the series. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.