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Alex Cross's trial / James Patterson and Richard DiLallo.

By: Patterson, James, 1947- [author.].
Contributor(s): DiLallo, Richard [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Patterson, James, Alex Cross series: 15.Alex Cross: 15.Publisher: New York : Little, Brown and Co., 2009Edition: First edition.Description: viii, 380, 7 pages ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780316070621; 0316070629.Subject(s): Ku Klux Klan (1915- ) -- Fiction | Cross, Alex (Fictitious character) -- Fiction | African Americans -- Southern States -- Social conditions -- Fiction | Police -- Washington (D.C.) -- Fiction | Lawyers -- Washington (D.C.) -- Fiction | Racism -- Mississippi -- Fiction | Mississippi -- Race relations -- Fiction | Southern States -- Race relations -- FictionGenre/Form: Legal stories. | Detective and mystery fiction. | Thrillers (Fiction) DDC classification: 813/.54 Summary: Detective Alex Cross tells the story of an ancestor, Abraham Cross, and his experiences with lawyer Ben Corbett, recounting one man's pursuit of justice in the face of the resurgence of Ku Klux Klan racism and violence in 1906 Eudora, Mississippi.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Suzanne Aubert Library at Jerusalem
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection PAT 1 Available T00491355
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Written in the fearless voice of Detective Alex Cross, Alex Cross's Trial is a #1 New York Times bestseller of murder, love, and above all, bravery.<br> <br> From his grandmother, Alex Cross has heard the story of his great uncle Abraham and his struggles for survival in the era of the Ku Klux Klan. Now, Alex passes the family tale along to his own children in a novel he's written-a novel called Trial. <br> <br> As a lawyer in turn-of-the-century Washington D.C., Ben Corbett represents the toughest cases. Fighting against oppression and racism, he risks his family and his life in the process. When President Roosevelt asks Ben to return to his home town to investigate rumors of the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan there, he cannot refuse.<br> <br> When he arrives in Eudora, Mississippi, Ben meets the wise Abraham Cross and his beautiful granddaughter, Moody. Ben enlists their help, and the two Crosses introduce him to the hidden side of the idyllic Southern town. Lynchings have become commonplace and residents of the town's black quarter live in constant fear. Ben aims to break the reign of terror-but the truth of who is really behind it could break his heart. Written in the fearless voice of Detective Alex Cross, Alex Cross's Trial is a gripping story of courage in the face of prejudice and terror.

Detective Alex Cross tells the story of an ancestor, Abraham Cross, and his experiences with lawyer Ben Corbett, recounting one man's pursuit of justice in the face of the resurgence of Ku Klux Klan racism and violence in 1906 Eudora, Mississippi.

Kotui multi-version record.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Fans of Patterson's serial-killer hunting detective, Alex Cross, expecting another cat-and-mouse thriller based on this book's title, will find Cross's appearance limited to a two-page preface in which the fictional character explains why he's written a book called Trial. Abraham Cross, a relative who lived in Eudora, Miss., at the beginning of the 20th century, helps liberal lawyer Ben Corbett to expose the truth about a wave of lynchings near that town, an assignment undertaken at the request of Corbett's friend, President Theodore Roosevelt. When Corbett arrives in Eudora, where he was born and raised, he receives a frosty reception from many unhappy with his record of representing African-Americans accused of murder, including a cold shoulder from his father, a judge. Soon, Corbett finds evidence that racism is alive and well, and that brutal murders of blacks, often for the most trivial of reasons, are endemic. Some may be disappointed that Abraham plays a relatively minor role, given the jacket line that "the Cross family had more than one hero." (Sept.) Copyright 2009 Reed Business Information.