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Nia and the new free library / by Ian Lendler ; illustrated by Mark Pett.

By: Lendler, IanContributor(s): Pett, Mark [illustrator.]Material type: TextTextPublisher: San Francisco, CA : Chronicle Books, [2021]Description: 1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 x 29 cmContent type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781452166865Subject(s): Books and reading -- Juvenile fiction | Libraries -- Juvenile fiction | Community life -- Juvenile fiction | Natural disasters -- Juvenile fiction | Writing -- Juvenile fictionSummary: When Littletown Library is destroyed by a tornado, it seems like book-loving Nia is the only one who cares; so she starts the "new free library" under the tree where she used to read, and writes out familiar stories and rhymes that are just a little bit wrong, and encourages the people who check them out to correct them--until soon the whole of Littletown is filled with people reading and writing books.
Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Childrens Picture Books Davis (Central) Library
Children's Picture Books
Children's Picture Books LEND Available T00843449
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This picture book tells the story of one girl who reminds an entire town of the joy of books.

When the town's old library is destroyed by a tornado, the people are left wondering: What should they do with the space where the library used to be?

The characters in Nia and the New Free Library all want different things: the builder wants there to be a new skyscraper, the grocer wants a new parking lot, but Nia just wants a new library . . . but how can one person build a whole library?

* Explores the power of community and what a group can accomplish
* Teaches the importance of working together toward a common goal
* Reminds readers of the important role libraries play in community, and how they work

Sometimes the biggest things can start with almost nothing at all.

Ian Lendler and Mark Pett bring humor and heart to this clever twist on the classic "Stone Soup" folktale.

* This triumphant ode to the magic of sharing stories is sure to strike a chord with bibliophiles of all genres, ages, and stripes.
* Resonates year-round as a go-to birthday or holiday gift for book-loving kids
* Perfect for children ages 5 to 8 years old
* Great gift for parents and grandparents, as well as librarians, teachers, and educators
* Add it to the shelf with books like Stone Soup by Marcia Brown, Delivering Your Mail by Ann Owen, and Seeds and Trees by Brandon Walden.

When Littletown Library is destroyed by a tornado, it seems like book-loving Nia is the only one who cares; so she starts the "new free library" under the tree where she used to read, and writes out familiar stories and rhymes that are just a little bit wrong, and encourages the people who check them out to correct them--until soon the whole of Littletown is filled with people reading and writing books.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

A brown-skinned, noodle-limbed child named Nia unites Littletown by reminding it of libraries' importance in this "Stone Soup"--inspired tale. When the Littletown Library, already old and abandoned, is carried away by a tornado, the town's residents wonder what to do with the empty lot. Nia, apparently the library's sole visitor, crafts a selection of tales from memory, calling the collection the New Free Library and offering it to residents. When her fellow citizens complain about errors, clever Nia merely hands them a pencil and paper to fix things. Lendler relays the tale in rhythmic, dialogue-heavy prose, offering allusions to classics ("What exactly is a rumpus?"). Pett illustrates in warm washes of color, with comic-style panels featuring a cast of figures of varying ages and skin tones. An entertaining narrative extolling the community-building virtues of libraries. Back matter includes an author's note. Ages 5--8. (June)

Booklist Review

Inspired by the story of how his grandfather got his town to build a library, Lendler cleverly tells his own version with this fresh variation on "Stone Soup." One day, a tornado blows through Nia's town and carries off its library. Other townsfolk think the space will be great for a new skyscraper or a parking lot, but Nia knows there needs to be a new library. She devises a plan and sits under her favorite tree to write all her favorite stories down--a process charmingly depicted in a series of panels showing Nia writing in a variety of positions, sometimes with the help of her dog. But eventually she writes enough to fill her "library" (red wagon) and passes the stories out to the townspeople, who begin writing their own stories. But where can they store these books? Well, the store owner makes some shelves, the builder constructs a building, and soon everyone is involved in creating and enjoying the new library, especially tenacious Nia. A heartening tale of community and perseverance.

Kirkus Book Review

Waiflike Nia convinces Littletown to rebuild its library after a tornado carries it away. The opening double-page spread mimics an album of photographs, starting with the earthbound library in a horse-and-buggy era and ending years later, with the building spun aloft in a tornado's funnel. Simple text asserts that the library had been there so long that "people stopped paying attention" and no one noticed when the librarian retired. Townspeople do notice the space left by the tornado; preliminary suggestions for projects are a skyscraper and a parking lot. Nia's suggestion is met with negative reactions from people who think that libraries are never used and are a waste of money. There is one stumbling moment when readers learn that decidedly young Nia had been checking out books weekly. How long ago had that librarian retired? Nevertheless, text, art, and layout combine to create a tale that is distinctive, whimsical, funny, and a pointed reminder about public libraries' value. Nia gathers some items in her red wagon: a desk, a chair, pencil and papers, and "a plate of orange slices for energy." She uses clever humility to lure townspeople into her scheme that readers familiar with the tale of "Stone Soup" may recognize. Tongue-in-cheek humor includes witty metafictional references. Warmly informal line-and-color art imbues the diverse inhabitants of Littletown with a sweet humanity--even in moments of disagreement. Nia has beige skin and wears her hair in a brown pageboy. A keeper. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright (c) Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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