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Apartment : a novel / Teddy Wayne.

By: Wayne, Teddy.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, New York : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2020Copyright date: ©2020Description: 195 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781635574005; 1635574005.Subject(s): Male friendship -- Fiction | Loneliness -- Fiction | Apartments -- Fiction | Roommates -- Fiction | New York (N.Y.) -- Fiction | Manhattan (New York, N.Y.) -- FictionGenre/Form: Domestic fiction. Additional physical formats: ebook version :: No titleDDC classification: 813/.6 Summary: "In 1996, the unnamed narrator in Teddy Wayne's Apartment is attending the MFA program at Columbia on his father's dime and living in an illegal sublet of a rent-stabilized apartment. Feeling guilty about his good fortune, the narrator offers his spare bedroom - rent-free - to Billy, a handsome, talented classmate from a working-class family in the Midwest, who is attending Columbia on scholarship. As the semester progresses, the narrator's rapport with Billy develops into a friendship he hasn't had over a lifetime of holding acquaintances at arm's length. But the close quarters and power imbalance of their living arrangement breed tensions that neither man could predict. In elegant prose that interrogates the Clinton-era origins of today's most sensitive and resonant issues - the spectrums of gender and sexuality, the clash between coastal liberalism and heartland conservatism, socioeconomic identity and privilege - Apartment is a gutting portrait of one of New York's many lost, disconnected souls"-- Provided by publisher.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection WAYN Available T00828527
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p> A New York Times Editors Choice <br> Longlisted for the 2020 Simpson / Joyce Carol Oates Literary Prize <br> One of Vogue.com's "Best Books of 2020 So Far" <br> One of Elle's "Best Books of 2020 So Far" <br> <br> Named A Most-Anticipated Book by The New York Times , Vogue, The Boston Globe, Salon ,<br> The Millions , Inside Hook , and Vol. 1 Brooklyn <br> <br> In 1996, the unnamed narrator of Teddy Wayne's Apartment is attending the MFA writing program at Columbia on his father's dime and living in an illegal sublet of a rent-stabilized apartment. Feeling guilty about his good fortune, he offers his spare bedroom--rent-free--to Billy, a talented, charismatic classmate from the Midwest eking out a hand-to-mouth existence in Manhattan.<br> <br> The narrator's rapport with Billy develops into the friendship he's never had due to a lifetime of holding people at arm's length, hovering at the periphery, feeling "fundamentally defective." But their living arrangement, not to mention their radically different upbringings, breeds tensions neither man could predict. Interrogating the origins of our contemporary political divide and its ties to masculinity and class, Apartment is a gutting portrait of one of New York's many lost, disconnected souls by a writer with an uncommon aptitude for embodying them.</p>

"In 1996, the unnamed narrator in Teddy Wayne's Apartment is attending the MFA program at Columbia on his father's dime and living in an illegal sublet of a rent-stabilized apartment. Feeling guilty about his good fortune, the narrator offers his spare bedroom - rent-free - to Billy, a handsome, talented classmate from a working-class family in the Midwest, who is attending Columbia on scholarship. As the semester progresses, the narrator's rapport with Billy develops into a friendship he hasn't had over a lifetime of holding acquaintances at arm's length. But the close quarters and power imbalance of their living arrangement breed tensions that neither man could predict. In elegant prose that interrogates the Clinton-era origins of today's most sensitive and resonant issues - the spectrums of gender and sexuality, the clash between coastal liberalism and heartland conservatism, socioeconomic identity and privilege - Apartment is a gutting portrait of one of New York's many lost, disconnected souls"-- Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Wayne's subtle, fascinating novel (after Loner) is set in the world of an MFA creative writing program at Columbia in 1996. The anxious, unnamed narrator didn't make any friends at New York University as an undergraduate, and considers it equally unlikely that he will find any among the ambitious, self-assured students in his current classes. He's delighted when charismatic Midwestern scholarship student Billy defends the first story the narrator presents against the attacks of the class, and invites Billy, who has been living in the basement of the bar where he works, to share the two-bedroom apartment the narrator's great-aunt has been allowing him to live in rent-free. Billy offers to clean the apartment and cook dinners in exchange for the room. At first, the narrator revels in the arrangement, but the balance of power between the two shifts gradually but irrevocably over the months that follow. The narrator, inclined to "airbrush out unpalatable blemishes here and there" in his past and his emotional life, notices and then immediately represses things like the way "the thin ribbed cotton of his white tank top hugged body like a second skin." Wayne keeps his attention firmly on the small details that define the evolving relationship as Billy loses interest in the narrator. Wayne excels at creating a narrator both observant of his surroundings and deluded about his own feelings. Underneath the straightforward story, readers will find a careful meditation on class and power. Agent: Jim Rutman, Sterling Lord Literistic. (Feb.)

Kirkus Book Review

Wayne's latest foray into the dark minds of lonely young men follows the rise and fall of a friendship between two aspiring fiction writers on opposite sides of a vast cultural divide.In 1996, our unnamed protagonist is living a cushy New York City life: He's a first-year student in Columbia's MFA program in fiction (the exorbitant bill footed by his father) who's illegally subletting his great-aunt's rent-controlled East Village apartment (for which his father also foots the bill). And it is in this stateacutely aware of his unearned advantages, questioning his literary potential, and deeply alonethat he meets Billy. Billy is an anomaly in the program: a community college grad from small-town Illinois, staggeringly talented, and very broke. But shared unease is as strong a foundation for friendship as any, and soon, our protagonist invites Billy to take over his spare room, a mutually beneficial if precarious arrangement. They are the very clear products of two different Americas, one the paragon of working-class hardscrabble masculinity, the other an exemplar of the emasculating properties of parental wealthmirror images, each in possession of what the other lacks. "He would always have to struggle to stay financially afloat," our protagonist realizes, "and I would always be fine, all because my father was a professional and his was a layabout. I had an abundance of resources; here was a concrete means for me to share it." And he means it, when he thinks it, and for a while, the affection between them is enough to (mostly) paper over the awkward imbalance of the setup. Wayne (Loner, 2016) captures the nuances of this dynamica musky cocktail of intimacy and rage and unspoken mutual resentmentwith draftsmanlike precision, and when the breaking point comes, as, of course, it does, it leaves one feeling vaguely ill, in the best way possible.A near-anthropological study of male insecurity. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.