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Double down / Gwenda Bond.

By: Bond, Gwenda.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Publisher: North Mankato, Minnesota : Switch Press, [2016]Copyright date: ©2016Description: 382 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781630790387; 1630790389; 9781630790394; 1630790397.Subject(s): Superheroes -- Fiction | Reporters and reporting -- Fiction | Friendship -- Fiction | High schools -- Fiction | Schools -- Fiction | Young adult fictionDDC classification: [Fic] Summary: Lois Lane has settled into life in Metropolis High, with new friends and a challenging job as a junior reporter--but after a visit to the "Suicide Slum" in search of a human interest story, she finds herself and her online more-than-friend SmallvilleGuy embroiled in a mystery involving a mysterious flying man, and the dirty criminal underbelly of Metropolis.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Teenage Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Teenage Fiction
Teenage Fiction BOND Available T00824066
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Lois Lane has settled in to her new school. She has friends, for maybe the first time in her life. She has a job that challenges her. And her friendship is growing with SmallvilleGuy, her online maybe-more-than-a-friend. But when her friend Maddy's twin collapses in a part of town she never should've been in, Lois finds herself embroiled in a dangerous mystery that brings her closer to the dirty underbelly of Metropolis.

"A novel"--Jacket.

"Superman and all related characters and elements are trademarks of and ©DC Comics"--Copyright page.

Lois Lane has settled into life in Metropolis High, with new friends and a challenging job as a junior reporter--but after a visit to the "Suicide Slum" in search of a human interest story, she finds herself and her online more-than-friend SmallvilleGuy embroiled in a mystery involving a mysterious flying man, and the dirty criminal underbelly of Metropolis.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Booklist Review

Lois Lane is on the trail of a hot new story for The Daily Scoop, but her fellow teen reporters are encountering major troubles: James' father (former Metropolis mayor, recently released from prison, and completely paranoid) seems to have been cloned, while Maddy's twin, Melody, keeps succumbing to dizzy spells that appear related to her participation in a shady twin survey. Meanwhile, Lois has admitted to herself that her online friendship with Smallville Guy means more to her than simply playing virtual reality games. Bond maintains the rapid-fire pace, witty banter, and clever allusions that made Fallout (2015) a winner, at the same time exploring thought-provoking ethical issues through Lois' whip-smart and sometimes socially awkward persona. Wonderful details abound, including the usage of a clippings file a nice touch in the age of Internet research. Superhero fans wishing for a fuller backstory on Superman's love interest will find it hard to wait for the sequel, which seems like a sure thing.--Carton, Debbie Copyright 2016 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Following the events of Fallout (2015), Lois Lane is still settling into her new life in Metropolis. Her relationship with the mysterious SmallvilleGuy is going well, and her reputation as a cutthroat reporter for the Daily Planet is intact. Lois' only problem is finding a second story to follow up her explosive premiere, but intrigue has rarely had a problem finding Lois Lane. The disgraced ex-mayor has been let out of prison, and his son thinks he might be innocent. A mysterious lab is leaving its test subjects out on the street with weird side effects. Meanwhile, the Web forum Lois and SmallvilleGuy frequent has been invaded by peculiar forces threatening to expose the Flying Man. That's a lot of balls to juggle, but Bond never drops a single one. She fills this adventure with the Golden Age sci-fi weirdness that permeated the comic books of the 1930s and '40s. The three mysteries dovetail together nicely in the end, with a few bread crumbs leading toward the next installment. Best of all, the novel ends as Lois crosses a line she will never be able to turn back from, a line that will mean big changes moving forward. In a sea of series that keep the characters status quo and rehash the same mysteries with different names and doodads, this is a godsend. A must read for comics fans and mystery enthusiasts alike. (Fiction. 12-16) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.