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A conversation with my country : where we've come from, where we can go / Alan Duff.

By: Duff, Alan, 1950-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, New Zealand : Penguin Random House New Zealand, 2019Copyright date: ©2019Description: 247 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780143773269 (paperback); 0143773267 (paperback).Subject(s): Duff, Alan, 1950- | Social problems -- New Zealand -- History -- 21st century | New Zealanders | Maori (New Zealand people) -- Social conditions -- 21st century | Tāngata | Āhuatanga pāpori | Kāwanatanga | Whakahāwea iwi | New Zealand -- Politics and government -- 21st century | New Zealand -- Social conditions -- 21st centuryDDC classification: 362.993 Summary: Returned from living in France, he views his country with fresh eyes, as it is now: homing in on the crises in parenting, our prisons, education and welfare systems, and a growing culture of entitlement that entraps Pakeha and Māori alike.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A fresh, personal account of New Zealand, now, from one of our hardest-hitting writers .

Following Once Were Warriors , Alan Duff wrote Maori- The Crisis and the Challenge . His controversial comments shook the country. A quarter of a century later, New Zealand and Maoridom are in a very different place. And so is Alan - he has published many more books, had two films made of his works, founded the Duffy Books in Homes literacy programme and endured 'some less inspiring moments, including bankruptcy'.

Returned from living in France, he views his country with fresh eyes, as it is now- homing in on the crises in parenting, our prisons, education and welfare systems, and a growing culture of entitlement that entraps Pakeha and Maori alike.

Never one to shy away from being a whetstone on which others can sharpen their own opinions, Alan tells it how he sees it.

Includes bibliographical references.

Returned from living in France, he views his country with fresh eyes, as it is now: homing in on the crises in parenting, our prisons, education and welfare systems, and a growing culture of entitlement that entraps Pakeha and Māori alike.