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He atua wahine at the source of ancient Maori healing in Aotearoa, New Zealand / Charlotte Mildon.

By: Mildon, Charlotte [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Hastings, New Zealand : Charlotte Mildon, [2018]Copyright date: �2018Description: 102 pages : illustrations ; 30 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780473386535; 0473386534.Subject(s): Priests -- New Zealand | Maori (New Zealand people) -- Religion | Maori (New Zealand people) -- Religion | Priests | New Zealand | Tohunga | Ao wairua | Tikanga tuku iho | Mauri | Wairua | Tikanga | K�orero nehe | Mana atuaSummary: This book is designed to support parents as first teachers, grandparents and teachers of Maori in Early Childhood, Kohanga Reo, Primary, Kura Kaupapa, Secondary education and Te Whare Wananga in New Zealand. The book presents some of the teachings of some expert Tohunga (priests/priestesses) in the Maori culture who, as toddlers, were taught the spiritual attributes of the Atua Wahine (divine feminine) amongst the landscapes of nature. It provides real life examples of te ao Maori knowledge that links into Papatuanuku (mother earth) and identifies some of the healing attributes of the Atua Wahine (the divine feminine). Oral forms of ancient Maori literature challenge contemporary definitions of Atua Maori (Gods and Goddesses) that have over the generations, served to subliminally poison the minds and hearts of vulnerable Maori children. Teaching children about the sustainability of the Atua wahine by nurturing our mother earth, our waters and our natural environment is vital to the survival of future generations in Aotearoa. A key implication of teachers teaching Maori, is to lead by example, cultivating a heart connection to nature that is fundamental to the healing wisdom of the Atua Maori.
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Te Taurawhiri Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Te Taurawhiri
Te Taurawhiri Coming Soon
Te Taurawhiri Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Te Taurawhiri
Te Taurawhiri Coming Soon
Te Taurawhiri Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Te Taurawhiri
Te Taurawhiri Coming Soon

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This book is designed to support parents as first teachers, grandparents and teachers of Maori in Early Childhood, Kohanga Reo, Primary, Kura Kaupapa, Secondary education and Te Whare Wananga in New Zealand. The book presents some of the teachings of some expert Tohunga (priests/priestesses) in the Maori culture who, as toddlers, were taught the spiritual attributes of the Atua Wahine (divine feminine) amongst the landscapes of nature. It provides real life examples of te ao Maori knowledge that links into Papatuanuku (mother earth) and identifies some of the healing attributes of the Atua Wahine (the divine feminine). Oral forms of ancient Maori literature challenge contemporary definitions of Atua Maori (Gods and Goddesses) that have over the generations, served to subliminally poison the minds and hearts of vulnerable Maori children. Teaching children about the sustainability of the Atua wahine by nurturing our mother earth, our waters and our natural environment is vital to the survival of future generations in Aotearoa. A key implication of teachers teaching Maori, is to lead by example, cultivating a heart connection to nature that is fundamental to the healing wisdom of the Atua Maori.

This book is designed to support parents as first teachers, grandparents and teachers of Maori in Early Childhood, Kohanga Reo, Primary, Kura Kaupapa, Secondary education and Te Whare Wananga in New Zealand. The book presents some of the teachings of some expert Tohunga (priests/priestesses) in the Maori culture who, as toddlers, were taught the spiritual attributes of the Atua Wahine (divine feminine) amongst the landscapes of nature. It provides real life examples of te ao Maori knowledge that links into Papatuanuku (mother earth) and identifies some of the healing attributes of the Atua Wahine (the divine feminine). Oral forms of ancient Maori literature challenge contemporary definitions of Atua Maori (Gods and Goddesses) that have over the generations, served to subliminally poison the minds and hearts of vulnerable Maori children. Teaching children about the sustainability of the Atua wahine by nurturing our mother earth, our waters and our natural environment is vital to the survival of future generations in Aotearoa. A key implication of teachers teaching Maori, is to lead by example, cultivating a heart connection to nature that is fundamental to the healing wisdom of the Atua Maori.