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Watch us rise / by Renée Watson and Ellen Hagan.

By: Watson, Renée.
Contributor(s): Hagan, Ellen [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, New York : Bloomsbury YA, [2019]Distributor: ©2019Description: 360 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781547600083; 154760008X; 9781526600868; 1526600862.Subject(s): Women's rights -- Fiction | Best friends -- Fiction | African American teenage girls -- Fiction | High schools -- Fiction | High school students -- Fiction | Friendship -- Fiction | Clubs -- Fiction | New York (N.Y.) -- FictionSummary: Jasmine and Chelsea are best friends on a mission--they're sick of the way women are treated even at their progressive NYC high school, so they decide to start a Women's Rights Club. They post their work online--poems, essays, videos of Chelsea performing her poetry, and Jasmine's response to the racial microaggressions she experiences--and soon they go viral. But with such positive support, the club is also targeted by trolls. When things escalate in real life, the principal shuts the club down. Not willing to be silenced, Jasmine and Chelsea will risk everything for their voices--and those of other young women--to be heard. These two dynamic, creative young women stand up and speak out in a novel that features their compelling art and poetry along with powerful personal journeys that will inspire readers and budding poets, feminists, and activists.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

"This stunning book is the story I've been waiting for my whole life; where girls rise up to claim their space with joy and power." --Laurie Halse Anderson, New York Times bestselling and award-winning author of Speak

"An extraordinary story of two indomitable spirits." --Brendan Kiely, New York Times bestselling co-author of All American Boys and Tradition

"Timely, thought-provoking, and powerful." --Julie Murphy, New York Times bestselling author of Dumplin'

Newbery Honor and Coretta Scott King Award-winning author Renée Watson teams up with poet Ellen Hagan in this YA feminist anthem about raising your voice.

Jasmine and Chelsea are best friends on a mission--they're sick of the way women are treated even at their progressive NYC high school, so they decide to start a Women's Rights Club. They post their work online--poems, essays, videos of Chelsea performing her poetry, and Jasmine's response to the racial microaggressions she experiences--and soon they go viral. But with such positive support, the club is also targeted by trolls. When things escalate in real life, the principal shuts the clubdown. Not willing to be silenced, Jasmine and Chelsea will risk everything for their voices--and those of other young women--to be heard.
These two dynamic, creative young women stand up and speak out in a novel that features their compelling art and poetry along with powerful personal journeys that will inspire readers and budding poets, feminists, and activists.

Acclaim for Piecing Me Together
2018 Newbery Honor Book
2018 Coretta Scott King Author Award
2017 Los Angeles Times Book Prize, Young Adult Finalist
"Timely and timeless." --Jacqueline Woodson, award-winning author of Brown Girl Dreaming
"Watson, with rhythm and style, somehow gets at . . . the life-changing power of voice and opportunity." --Jason Reynolds, NYT-bestselling author of Long Way Down
"Brilliant." --John Green, New York Times bestselling author of The Fault in Our Stars
* "Teeming with compassion and insight." -- Publishers Weekly , starred review
* "A timely, nuanced, and unforgettable story about the power of art, community, and friendship." -- Kirkus , starred review
* "A nuanced meditation on race, privilege, and intersectionality." -- SLJ , starred review

Includes bibliographical references (pages 357-360).

Jasmine and Chelsea are best friends on a mission--they're sick of the way women are treated even at their progressive NYC high school, so they decide to start a Women's Rights Club. They post their work online--poems, essays, videos of Chelsea performing her poetry, and Jasmine's response to the racial microaggressions she experiences--and soon they go viral. But with such positive support, the club is also targeted by trolls. When things escalate in real life, the principal shuts the club down. Not willing to be silenced, Jasmine and Chelsea will risk everything for their voices--and those of other young women--to be heard. These two dynamic, creative young women stand up and speak out in a novel that features their compelling art and poetry along with powerful personal journeys that will inspire readers and budding poets, feminists, and activists.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

From poet Hagan and the author of Piecing Me Together comes a complex and socially conscious coming-of-age tale featuring young women of color. Jasmine, a plus-size African-American girl with a passion for acting, and her best friend Chelsea, a white girl and budding feminist, attend a social justice-focused high school in Manhattan's Washington Heights neighborhood. As the two struggle with the racism and sexism that are thriving even in seemingly progressive spaces, they come into their own as young activists pushing back against injustice. The characters are very human in both their passions and their frailties (Jasmine's struggle to cope with her father's terminal cancer; Chelsea's occasional concessions to the same female ideals she rails against), but strong messaging can sometimes bog down the book's pace as the girls stop everything to educate their parents, teachers, and a crush about institutionalized discrimination. The most important message is actually more subtle than the girls': by following their convictions, young women have the power to change the world for the better. It's a message, and a story, that any teen could benefit from and enjoy. Ages 13-up. Author's agent: Rosemary Stimola, Stimola Literary Studio. Artist's agent: Cindy Uh, Thompson Literary Agency. (Feb.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up-A highly needed work for the #MeToo movement. Told from the viewpoints of Chelsea and Jasmine, this thought-provoking novel explores ideas of body-shaming, racial stereotypes, and gender inequality. Chelsea is a poet and Jasmine is a writer and actress. Fed up with their school's lack of acknowledgement of women's rights, they decide to take a stand with their blog, "Write Like A Girl." It catches the attention of many of their fellow classmates and other teens, but causes problems for them with faculty. Will they be able to enlighten their school community or make things worse for themselves? Readers will enjoy the original poems and creative, witty blog entries. The ending will leave teens inspired to make a difference and challenge the status quo. Watson and Hagan do not disappoint in this powerful story of two girls who take a stand against injustice while learning how to navigate a world that seeks to silence them. -VERDICT A timely and must-have collaboration for all YA collections-Cicely Lewis, Meadowcreek High School © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

This is a refreshingly unapologetic celebration of young women's voices in a format that encompasses poetry, blog posts, essays, and prose. Best friends Jasmine and Chelsea intend to start junior year at their progressive, social-justice-focused high school on a high note in their respective clubs: for Jasmine, the August Wilson Acting Ensemble and for Chelsea, the Peaceful Poets. When both are (ironically) met with resistance to new, more inclusive ideas, they decide to leave their clubs and form a new one focused on elevating women's voices, especially those of activists and people of color. When their blog, Write Like a Girl, goes viral, the school's administration attempts to shut them down. Watson and Hagan keep Jasmine and Chelsea's voices distinct and allow them to resound with authenticity. Despite facing very real hardships like fat-shaming, sexism, and loss of a parent, Jasmine and Chelsea are steadfast in their convictions and relentlessly supportive of both each other and their own emotions. Readers won't be able to help feeling empowered and uplifted by the end of the novel.--Caitlin Kling Copyright 2019 Booklist

Horn Book Review

African American girl Jasmine is starting junior year at NYC's Amsterdam High with her (white) best friend Chelsea. Early in the school year, both girls are confronted with racism and sexism in their respective clubs. This leads to Jasmine and Chelsea starting their own club, Write like a Girl, which attracts both fans and trolls. Alternating narratives build a relatable, realistic, and inspiring story for teens. (c) Copyright 2019. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

A manifesto for budding feminists. At the core of this engaging novel are besties Chelsea, who is Irish- and Italian-American and into fashion and beauty, and Jasmine, who is African-American, loves the theater, and pushes back against bias around size ("I don't need your fake compliments, your pity. I know I'm beautiful. Inside and out"). They and their sidekicks, half-Japanese/half-Lebanese Nadine and Puerto Rican Isaac, grow into first-class activistssimultaneously educating their peers and readers. The year gets off to a rocky start at their progressive, social justice-oriented New York City high school: Along with the usual angst many students experience, Jasmine's father is terminally ill with cancer, and after things go badly in both their clubs, Jasmine and Chelsea form a women's rights club which becomes the catalyst for their growth as they explore gender inequality and opportunities for change. This is an inspiring look at two strong-willed teens growing into even stronger young women ready to use their voices and take on the world, imploring budding feminists everywhere to "join the revolution." The book offers a poetic balance of dialogue among the main characters, their peers, and the adults in their lives. The exquisite pacing, which intersperses everyday teen conflicts with weightier issues, demonstrates how teens long to be heard and taken seriously.A book that seamlessly brings readers along on a journey of impact and empowerment. (resources for young activists, endnotes) (Fiction. 12-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.