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Japanese nursery rhymes : Carp streamers, Falling rain, and other traditional favorites / Danielle Wright ; illustrated by Helen Acraman ; [translations by Anna Yamashita Minoura].

By: Wright, Danielle.
Contributor(s): Acraman, Helen [illustrator.] | Minoura, Anna Yamashita [translator.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Share and sing.Publisher: Tokyo, Japan ; Tuttle Publishing, 2011Description: 32 p.ages : colour illustrations ; 29 cm. + 1 sound disc (digital ; 12 cm).Content type: text | spoken word | performed music Media type: unmediated | audio Carrier type: volume | audio discISBN: 9784805311882 ; 1920739016006.Subject(s): Nursery rhymes, Japanese | Children's poetry, Japanese | Children's songs, Japanese | Japanese language materials -- Bilingual | Japan -- Juvenile literature
Contents:
Hometown / by Tatsuyuki Takano -- The roly-poly acorn / by Nagayoshi Aoki -- The village festival / by Japan's Ministry of Education -- Chorus of the raccoons / by Ujou Noguchi -- Falling rain / by Hakushuu Kitahara -- Little red bird / by Hakushuu Kitahara -- Bubbles / by Ujou Noguchi -- Train -- Come spring / by Gyofuu Souma -- Carp streamers / by Miyako Kondo -- The seagull sailors / by Toshiko Takeuchi -- Snow / by Japan's Ministry of Education -- The rabbit's dance / by Hakushuu Kitahara -- Moon / by Japan's Ministry of Education -- The cradle lullaby / by Ujou Noguchi.
Summary: Traditional Japanese verses depicting the natural world and the many tiny moments that make childhood special, such as blowing bubbles, escaping the rain, rolling an acorn, and flying a kite. Presented in Japanese script, Japanese romanized form, and English.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Childrens Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Children's Non-fiction
Children's Non-fiction 495.6 WRI Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

**2012 Creative Child Magazine Media of the Year Award Winner!**

A delightful collection of fifteen well-loved rhymes, Japanese Nursery Rhymes is the perfect introduction to Japanese language and culture for young readers.

What better way to learn the Japanese language than through rhymes and music. This beautifully illustrated multicultural book features songs and rhymes in both English and Japanese. Accompanied by an audio CD with recordings of kids singing in both languages -- songs so fun and charming, it will be nearly impossible for you not to sing along!

Favorite Japanese songs and rhymes include: My Hometown Bubbles The Rabbit Dance The Cradle Lullaby and many more!
For preschoolers and beyond, this book will be a joy to the mind, the eye, the ear and the heart.

Hometown / by Tatsuyuki Takano -- The roly-poly acorn / by Nagayoshi Aoki -- The village festival / by Japan's Ministry of Education -- Chorus of the raccoons / by Ujou Noguchi -- Falling rain / by Hakushuu Kitahara -- Little red bird / by Hakushuu Kitahara -- Bubbles / by Ujou Noguchi -- Train -- Come spring / by Gyofuu Souma -- Carp streamers / by Miyako Kondo -- The seagull sailors / by Toshiko Takeuchi -- Snow / by Japan's Ministry of Education -- The rabbit's dance / by Hakushuu Kitahara -- Moon / by Japan's Ministry of Education -- The cradle lullaby / by Ujou Noguchi.

Traditional Japanese verses depicting the natural world and the many tiny moments that make childhood special, such as blowing bubbles, escaping the rain, rolling an acorn, and flying a kite. Presented in Japanese script, Japanese romanized form, and English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

The 15 Japanese nursery rhymes in this gentle collection include two types: traditional Warabe Uta rhymes and comparatively modern Doyo verses. The nursery rhymes are printed in Japanese text and characters, and are also translated into English. Acraman's graphics combine a polished digital aesthetic with playfully anthropomorphic characters, including three stylized birds perched on a tree ("Little bird, red bird/ Why oh why so red? Because it ate a red fruit") and endearing rabbits wearing "hachimaki" bandannas. Accessible verses and bright, welcoming pictures should have cross-cultural appeal while aiding in language learning. Includes a CD recording of the songs performed both in English and Japanese. Ages 4-8. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Fifteen rhymes, one per spread, celebrate the changing seasons, flora and fauna, and idyllic rural life, providing an enchanting window into a culture that cherishes its close relationship with nature. Readers need not be familiar with Japan to savor these songs. The author's introduction gives the origins of the selections and presents a clear overview of the three Japanese writing systems. A helpful pronunciation guide assists those new to the language, and occasional footnotes explain cultural references in the song lyrics, such as the significance of carp streamers on Children's Day. The nursery rhymes appear in an easy-to-read format that boosts language comprehension during sing-alongs, with each line printed in Japanese characters, romanized Japanese, and English. Children will pore over the brightly colored illustrations that evoke a warm, inviting image of the country. Vivid, graphical artwork in the style of modern woodblock prints depicts happy children and endearing animals while incorporating Japanese motifs such as tiled-roof houses, kimonos, and tanuki (raccoon dogs). The accompanying music CD is vital to this book's enjoyment as it teaches the tunes and aids in pronunciation. The audio recordings are pleasant, gentle renditions in both Japanese and English. This collection holds appeal for anyone interested in the country and would be a wonderful addition to an international-themed storytime.-Allison Tran, Mission Viejo Library, CA (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

When her child was born, Wright looked for nursery rhymes from around the world. In Japanese nursery rhymes, I found very beautiful and delicate verses with an emphasis on the natural world and dedicated to the many tiny movements that make childhood special, she writes. The book she has created, along with New Zealand artist Acraman, is very special as well. Each poem is introduced in a two-page spread. The words are written in Japanese script, a Roman alphabet transliteration, and the English translation. The spacious format gives the art a chance to perform its magic. Pure saturated colors honey yellows, tomato reds, and heavenly blues are the backdrops for pictures that have the effect of woodcuts. The poems themselves show off the charm and delicacy Wright discusses in her introduction. In the rhyme Snow, for example, a girl enjoys warm noodles in a cozy home, while outside the bare trees become covered in snowy flowers. An accompanying CD adds to the book's usefulness and delight.--Cooper, Ilene Copyright 2010 Booklist

Horn Book Review

Warm, flat art illustrates these fifteen songs--rhymes traditionally sung in games and modern songs written for singing in school. Little additional information is provided, and the English translations are awkward, especially on the audio CD. But language learners will appreciate the Japanese/romanized Japanese/English text, and the CD's guitar accompaniment is a welcome alternative to the numerous widely available Muzak-like versions of these songs. (c) Copyright 2012. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

Fifteen short, simple songs in Japanese and English seem to be designed more for language practice than actual sharing. The poems are presented line by line in Japanese characters (three different kinds are used, though only one per poem), a phonetic transcription and a loose but clunky and unrhymed English translation. They include authentically childlike celebrations of rabbits dancing ("Come see, come see the adorable dance / Hoppedy hop, hoppedy hop"), carp streamers "swimming happily in the air" and falling rain ("Picchi picchi chappu chappu / Splish splash, splish splash"). There are also wistful memories of "My Hometown" and a festival song that begins, "Our village guardian god's generosity / Is what we celebrate on this joyous day / Boom boom, whistle whistle." On an accompanying CD, tracks identified only by numbers alternate Japanese and English performances of each entry (the former sounding far more natural than the latter), sung in very high voices over solo guitar accompaniments. There is no printed music. Acraman's art is more toddler-friendly than the lyrics, with plenty of muted but distinct colors and simple, blocky forms. The Japanese versions' bouncy rhythms are lost in translation, and even hopes for the sort of cultural insights that folk poetry affords go unfulfilled, since nearly all of the selections are attributed to modern lyricists and composers. (Bilingual nursery songs. 1-4)]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.