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Telling the real story : genre and New Zealand Literature / Erin Mercer.

By: Mercer, Erin, 1977-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Victoria University Press, 2017Description: 386 pages ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781776560851; 177656085X.Subject(s): New Zealand literature -- History and criticism | Fiction genresDDC classification: NZ820.9
Contents:
'Back towards the middle-of-the-road' -- The 'Relentless "middling" of our literature' -- 'Manuka bushes covered with thick spider webs': Realism and Gothicism in Frank Sargeson and Katherine Mansfield -- Showing things as they really are: Realism and romance in John Mulgan's Man Alone -- 'Unrestrained exercise of personal fantasy': Women's writing, the melodramatic and the imaginary -- The 'provincial period': Realism, romance and the great unread New Zealand novel -- 'An inbuilt point of crisis': Breaking the restrictions of realism -- 'Something that described the real New Zealand': Keri Hulme's The Bone People and Witi Ihimaera's The Matriarch -- 'Maybe it would work in New York': The problems of place and genre -- 'Curnow's rundown homestead': Answering a realist tradition.
Summary: "Telling the Real Story interrogates the relationships between genre and New Zealand literature. What modes of writing have been deemed more appropriate than others at particular times, and why? Why have some narratives been interpreted as realist when significant aspects of them relate to genres such as romance, science fiction and Gothic? What meanings are generated by the meeting points in a text where one mode meets another? What is at stake in writing, for example, a New Zealand vampire novel or an art world thriller? By rereading canonical texts and exploring writers who have been sidelined for their use of non-realist elements, Telling the Real Story exposes the interplay of realism, Gothic, fantasy, romance and melodrama within New Zealand narratives and demonstrates that the apparently realist monolith of the national literature is infinitely more diverse and exciting than it may seem. Frank Sargeson, Sylvia Ashton-Warner, Keri Hulme, Elizabeth Knox and Eleanor Catton are among the major New Zealand writers whose work is seen in fresh and exciting ways"-- Back cover.
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Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 820.9 MER Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Telling the Real Story: Genre and New Zealand Literature interrogates the relationships between genre, realism and New Zealand literature. What modes of writing have been deemed more appropriate than others at particular times, and why? Why have some narratives been interpreted as realist when significant aspects of them play on romance, science fiction and Gothic? What meanings are generated by the meeting points in a text where one mode meets another? What is at stake in writing, for example, a New Zealand vampire novel or an art world thriller?By rereading canonical texts and exploring writers who have been sidelined because of their use of non-realist elements, Telling the Real Story exposes the interplay of realism, Gothic, fantasy, romance and melodrama within New Zealand narratives and demonstrates that the apparently realist monolith of the national literature is infinitely more diverse and exciting than it may seem.Frank Sargeson, Sylvia Ashton-Warner, Keri Hulme, Elizabeth Knox and Eleanor Catton are among the major New Zealand writers whose work is seen in fresh and exciting ways.

Includes bibliographical references.

'Back towards the middle-of-the-road' -- The 'Relentless "middling" of our literature' -- 'Manuka bushes covered with thick spider webs': Realism and Gothicism in Frank Sargeson and Katherine Mansfield -- Showing things as they really are: Realism and romance in John Mulgan's Man Alone -- 'Unrestrained exercise of personal fantasy': Women's writing, the melodramatic and the imaginary -- The 'provincial period': Realism, romance and the great unread New Zealand novel -- 'An inbuilt point of crisis': Breaking the restrictions of realism -- 'Something that described the real New Zealand': Keri Hulme's The Bone People and Witi Ihimaera's The Matriarch -- 'Maybe it would work in New York': The problems of place and genre -- 'Curnow's rundown homestead': Answering a realist tradition.

"Telling the Real Story interrogates the relationships between genre and New Zealand literature. What modes of writing have been deemed more appropriate than others at particular times, and why? Why have some narratives been interpreted as realist when significant aspects of them relate to genres such as romance, science fiction and Gothic? What meanings are generated by the meeting points in a text where one mode meets another? What is at stake in writing, for example, a New Zealand vampire novel or an art world thriller? By rereading canonical texts and exploring writers who have been sidelined for their use of non-realist elements, Telling the Real Story exposes the interplay of realism, Gothic, fantasy, romance and melodrama within New Zealand narratives and demonstrates that the apparently realist monolith of the national literature is infinitely more diverse and exciting than it may seem. Frank Sargeson, Sylvia Ashton-Warner, Keri Hulme, Elizabeth Knox and Eleanor Catton are among the major New Zealand writers whose work is seen in fresh and exciting ways"-- Back cover.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Acknowledgements (p. 7)
  • Introduction: 'Back Towards the Middle-of-the-Road' (p. 9)
  • 1 The 'Relentless "Middling" of Our Literature' (p. 23)
  • 2 'Manuka bushes covered with thick spider webs': Realism and Gothicism in Frank Sargeson and Katherine Mansfield (p. 48)
  • 3 Showing Things as They Really Are: Realism and Romance in John Mulgan's Man Alone (p. 84)
  • 4 'Unrestrained Exercise of Personal Fantasy': Women's Writing, the Melodramatic and the Imaginary (p. 110)
  • 5 The 'provincial period': Realism, Romance and the Great Unread New Zealand Novel (p. 141)
  • 6 'An Inbuilt Point of Crisis': Breaking the Restrictions of Realism (p. 173)
  • 7 'Something that described the real New Zealand': Keri Hulme's The Bone People and Witi Ihimaera's The Matriarch (p. 205)
  • 8 'Maybe it would work in New York': The Problems of Place and Genre (p. 235)
  • 9 'Curnow's Rundown Homestead': Answering a Realist Tradition (p. 274)
  • Conclusion: The 'articulation of New Zealandness' (p. 310)
  • Notes (p. 317)
  • Bibliography (p. 349)
  • Index (p. 375)