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The Roanoke girls [text (large print)] / Amy Engel.

By: Engel, Amy [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Waterville, Maine : Thorndike Press, a part of Gale, Cengage Learning, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Edition: Large print edition.Description: 443 pages (large print) : genealogical table ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781432838911 (large print : hardcover); 1432838911 (large print : hardcover).Subject(s): Family secrets -- Fiction | Large type books | Cousins -- Fiction | Missing persons -- FictionGenre/Form: Psychological fiction. | Thrillers (Fiction)DDC classification: 813/.6 Summary: After her mother's suicide, fifteen year-old Lane Roanoke lived with her grandparents and cousin Allegra on their rural Kansas estate. Lane embraced life as one of the rich and beautiful Roanoke girls. But after discovering the dark truth about the family, she ran . . . fast and far away. Eleven years later, Allegra goes missing. Did she run too? Or something worse?
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Large Print ENGE Checked out 24/07/2019

"A novel"--Cover.

After her mother's suicide, fifteen year-old Lane Roanoke lived with her grandparents and cousin Allegra on their rural Kansas estate. Lane embraced life as one of the rich and beautiful Roanoke girls. But after discovering the dark truth about the family, she ran . . . fast and far away. Eleven years later, Allegra goes missing. Did she run too? Or something worse?

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

Prologue  The first time I saw Roanoke was in a dream. I knew little of it beyond its name and the fact it was in Kansas, a place I had never been. My mother only ever mentioned it when she'd had too much wine, her breath turned sweet and her words slow and syrupy like molasses. So my subconscious filled in the rest. In my dream it stood tall and stately, tucked among a forest of spring-green trees. Its red-brick facade was broken up by black shutters, white trim, delicate wrought-iron balconies. A little girl's fantasy of a princess castle. When I woke, I started to tell my mother about it. Talking through a mouthful of stale Cheerios drowned in just-this-side-of-sour milk. I got only as far as the name, Roanoke, before she stopped me. "It was nothing like that," she said, voice flat. She was sitting on the wide windowsill, knees drawn up into her cotton nightgown, smoke from her cigarette gathered around her like a shroud. Her ragged toenails dug into the wooden window frame. "You didn't even let me tell you," I whined. "Did you wake up screaming?" A dribble of milk ran down my chin. "Huh?" She turned and glanced at me then, her skin pale, eyes red-rimmed.The bones of her face looked sharp enough to cut. "Was it a nightmare?" I shook my head, confused and a little scared. "No."She looked back out the window. "Then it was nothing like that." Excerpted from The Roanoke Girls: A Novel by Amy Engel All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

When 15-year-old Lane Roanoke is sent to live with her grandparents and her cousin Allegra in their rambling Kansas mansion, she secretly hopes she'll finally find the sense of home and family she never had with her own mother. Instead, she uncovers secrets darker and more dangerous than she could ever have imagined. Ten years later, Lane is drawn back to the family home to help solve the mystery of Allegra's disappearance. Alternating between the narrative present and Lane's first summer in Kansas, Engel (The Book of Ivy) skillfully builds suspense and unfolds mysteries bit by bit. The vivid characters are made all the more complex by the horrors they're sucked into, and even the lighter notes of the novel-first loves, rekindled relationships-are tainted with the darkness that threatens to engulf them all. Tension runs through the novel from beginning to end and teases out the basic human emotions-guilt, love, jealousy, and fear. The themes and characters come to life through Brittany Pressley's gifted narration. She uses a thoughtful and straightforward tone the reader can imagine coming directly from Lane herself. -VERDICT Surprisingly easy to listen to despite its dark subject matter, this gripping work is a definite recommendation for fans of mystery, romance, and coming-of-age novels. ["Atmospheric and unsettling tale of the secrets and bonds of family, set against the backdrop of small-town Kansas": LJ 12/16 review of the Crown hc.]-Samantha Facciolo, New York © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

YA author Engel (The Book of Ivy) makes her adult debut with a gripping if creepy thriller set on the Kansas prairie. Lane Roanoke fervently hoped she had seen the last of Roanoke, the family homestead, when she fled Kansas for Los Angeles as a desperate 16-year-old, but now a decade later the disappearance of her cousin Allegra, the only kin to whom she feels a connection, compels her to return against her better judgment. Indeed, with local law enforcement stymied, it seems that the only hope of solving the mystery lies with Lane and whatever clues she can dredge up from memories of the traumatic summer the two cousins shared as teens. Skipping lightly between past and present, including Lane's efforts to finally come to terms with the two most influential men in her life-dangerously seductive family patriarch Yates and roguish Cooper Sullivan, her never-forgotten first love-this gothic page-turner speeds inexorably toward the kinds of devastating revelations readers won't soon forget. Agent: Jodi Reamer, Writers House. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

After her mother commits suicide, 16-year-old Lane Roanoke moves from New York to Osage Flats, Kansas, to live with her grandparents and her cousin Allegra. Both girls' mothers left Lane's grandparents years earlier. Over the course of the summer, Lane and Allegra explore their places in the line of Roanoke girls their mothers, aunts, and grandmother who all lived in Osage Flats. Soon, Lane uncovers the reason her mother fled the family and runs away herself, abandoning Allegra. Ten years later, her grandfather calls to tell her that Allegra is missing. Lane returns to confront her tangled past and search for her beloved cousin. Engel tells Lane's story in chapters that alternate between Then and Now and includes single chapters from each of the other Roanoke girls. The story is partially a modern mystery and partially an exploration of traumatic family dynamics and the nature of love. In Engel's (The Book of Ivy, 2014) first novel for adults, she succeeds in creating an emotionally captivating story that will leave readers reaching for her earlier, young adult work.--Chanoux, Laura Copyright 2017 Booklist