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Hoard / Fleur Adcock.

By: Adcock, Fleur.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington [New Zealand] : Victoria University Press, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 96 pages ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781776561674; 1776561678.Genre/Form: New Zealand poetry -- 21st century.DDC classification: NZ821.2
Contents:
Loot -- Mnemonic -- Her usual hand -- Six typewriters -- Flat-warming party, 1958 -- The anaesthetist -- The second wedding -- The sleeping bag -- The game of 500 -- La Contessa Scalza -- North London Polytechnic -- Election, 1964 -- Kidnapped -- Ann Jane's husband -- Mother's knee -- Camisoles -- The march -- You, Ellen -- Hortus -- A spinney -- Fox-light -- Albatross -- Cheveux de Lin -- My erstwhile fans -- The bookshop -- Maulden Church meadow -- Oscar and Henry -- Real estate -- The lipstick -- Hair -- Pacifiers -- Bender -- Hot baths -- Standedge -- Hic iacet -- Pakiri -- Helensville -- Ruakaka -- Blue stars -- Fowlds park -- Mercer -- Alfriston -- Thames -- Raglan -- Miramar revisited -- Carterton -- Tinakori road -- High rise -- The old government buildings -- Lotus land.
Summary: "Hoard brings together poems Fleur Adcock had to keep under wraps for several years because they didn't suit the themes of her last two collections, The Land Ballot and Glass Wings. They include reflections on the tools of her trade (handwriting, typewriters), snatches of autobiography (a brief, ill-considered second marriage followed by her migration from New Zealand to England in 1963), and poems on trees, wildlife and everyday objects. Ellen Wilkinson, who led the Jarrow March in 1936, makes two appearances, joining Coleridge, several ancestors and two dogs. The most recent poems in the book recall Adcock's visits around the North Island in 2015, affirming her renewed although not uncritical affection for the country of her birth"--Back cover.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Hoard brings together poems Fleur Adcock had to keep under wraps for several years because they didn't suit the themes of her last two collections, The Land Ballot and Glass Wings. They include reflections on the tools of her trade (handwriting, typewriters), snatches of autobiography (a brief, ill-considered second marriage followed by her migration from New Zealand to England in 1963), and poems on trees, wildlife and everyday objects. Ellen Wilkinson, who led the Jarrow March in 1936, makes two appearances, joining Coleridge, several ancestors and two dogs. The most recent poems in the book recall Adcock's visits around the North Island in 2015, affirming her renewed although not uncritical affection for the country of her birth.

Published in the UK by Bloodaxe Books, Ltd.

Loot -- Mnemonic -- Her usual hand -- Six typewriters -- Flat-warming party, 1958 -- The anaesthetist -- The second wedding -- The sleeping bag -- The game of 500 -- La Contessa Scalza -- North London Polytechnic -- Election, 1964 -- Kidnapped -- Ann Jane's husband -- Mother's knee -- Camisoles -- The march -- You, Ellen -- Hortus -- A spinney -- Fox-light -- Albatross -- Cheveux de Lin -- My erstwhile fans -- The bookshop -- Maulden Church meadow -- Oscar and Henry -- Real estate -- The lipstick -- Hair -- Pacifiers -- Bender -- Hot baths -- Standedge -- Hic iacet -- Pakiri -- Helensville -- Ruakaka -- Blue stars -- Fowlds park -- Mercer -- Alfriston -- Thames -- Raglan -- Miramar revisited -- Carterton -- Tinakori road -- High rise -- The old government buildings -- Lotus land.

"Hoard brings together poems Fleur Adcock had to keep under wraps for several years because they didn't suit the themes of her last two collections, The Land Ballot and Glass Wings. They include reflections on the tools of her trade (handwriting, typewriters), snatches of autobiography (a brief, ill-considered second marriage followed by her migration from New Zealand to England in 1963), and poems on trees, wildlife and everyday objects. Ellen Wilkinson, who led the Jarrow March in 1936, makes two appearances, joining Coleridge, several ancestors and two dogs. The most recent poems in the book recall Adcock's visits around the North Island in 2015, affirming her renewed although not uncritical affection for the country of her birth"--Back cover.