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Ordinary time / Anna Livesey.

By: Livesey, Anna, 1979-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Victoria University Press, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 55 pages ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781776561605; 1776561600.Genre/Form: New Zealand poetry -- 21st century
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction (NEST)
Non-Fiction (NEST) 821 LIV Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Peter Singer says we are all equally valuable and I believe him. This means I should do more, that the care of one small bundle (never mind that it is my bundle) is insufficient--even if this is what I am fitted to do. Across the road two magnolias, one pink, one white. In the days since we came home I've watched their stark flower-spiked branches soften and go pastoral--the green leaves of ordinary time climbing out of the wood. The thing is, there isn't any indefinite 'later': childhood, adolescence, adulthood. Then, God willing, I'll be wearing out. Already as I lay this down I see you as the reader. I think: A decorative mind isn't much of an inheritance; and One day there'll be no book of mine left on the earth. Having started as a poet I suppose any contribution is a positive mark on the ledger. --"Ordinary Time"

Poems.

"Peter Singer says we are all equally valuable and I believe him. This means I should do more, that the care of one small bundle (never mind that it is my bundle) is insufficient—even if this is what I am fitted to do. Across the road two magnolias, one pink, one white. In the days since we came home I’ve watched their stark flower-spiked branches soften and go pastoral—the green leaves of ordinary time climbing out of the wood. The thing is, there isn’t any indefinite ‘later’: childhood, adolescence, adulthood. Then, God willing, I’ll be wearing out. Already as I lay this down I see you as the reader. I think: A decorative mind isn’t much of an inheritance; and One day there’ll be no book of mine left on the earth. Having started as a poet I suppose any contribution is a positive mark on the ledger."