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Nowherelands : an atlas of vanished countries, 1840-1975 / Bjorn Berge ; translated by Lucy Moffatt.

By: Berge, Bjørn.
Contributor(s): Moffat, Lucy [translator.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England ; New York, New York : Thames & Hudson, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 240 pages : illustrations (some colour), colour maps ; 18 x 23 cm.Content type: text | still image | cartographic image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780500519905; 0500519900.Other title: Nowhere lands | Atlas of vanished countries, 1840-1975.Uniform titles: Landene som forsvant, 1840-1970. English Subject(s): Historical geography | History, Modern -- 19th century | History, Modern -- 20th century | World politics | Political geography | National characteristics | Postage stamps -- History -- 19th century | Postage stamps -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Atlases.DDC classification: 909.8 Summary: A multitude of countries that once existed have since been erased from the map. Varying vastly in size and shape, location and longevity, the fifty 'nowherelands' in this book are united by one fact: all of them endured long enough to issue their own stamps. Some of their names, such as Biafra or New Brunswick, will be relatively familiar. Others, such as Labuan, Tannu Tuva, and Inini, are far less recognizable. But all of these lost nations have stories to tell, whether they were as short-lived as Eastern Karelia, which lasted only a few weeks during the Soviet-Finnish War of 1922, or as long-lasting as the Orange Free State, a Boer Republic that celebrated fifty years as an independent state in the late 1800s. Their broad spectrum reflects the entire history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with its ideologies, imperialism, waves of immigration, and conflicts both major and minor. The motifs and symbols chosen for stamps have always served as a form of national self-presentation, an expression of the aims and ambitions of the ruling authorities. Drawing on fiction and eye-witness accounts as well as historical sources, Bjorn Berge's witty text casts an unconventional eye on these lesser-known nations. Nowherelands is a different kind of history book that will intrigue anyone keen to understand what makes a nation a nation.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction (NEST)
Non-Fiction (NEST) 909.8 BER Checked out 24/09/2019

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

These are the stories of fifty countries that once existed but have now have been erased from the map. Varying vastly in size and shape, location and longevity, they are united by one fact: all of them endured long enough to issue their own stamps.Some of their names, such as Biafra or New Brunswick, will be relatively familiar. Others, such as Labuan, Tannu Tuva, and Inini, are far less recognizable. But all of these lost nations have stories to tell, whether they were as short- lived as Eastern Karelia, which lasted only a few weeks during the Soviet- Finnish War of 1922, or as long- lasting as the Orange Free State, a Boer Republic that celebrated fifty years as an independent state in the late 1800s. Their broad spectrum reflects the entire history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with its ideologies, imperialism, waves of immigration, and conflicts both major and minor.The motifs and symbols chosen for stamps have always served as a form of national self- presentation, an expression of the aims and ambitions of the ruling authorities. Drawing on fiction and eye- witness accounts as well as historical sources, Bjorn Berge's witty text casts an unconventional eye on these lesser- known nations. Nowherelands is a different kind of history book that will intrigue anyone keen to understand what makes a nation a nation.

Originally published in Norwegian as Landene som forsvant, 1840-1970: Oslo : Spartacus Forlag, 2016.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 224-236) and index.

A multitude of countries that once existed have since been erased from the map. Varying vastly in size and shape, location and longevity, the fifty 'nowherelands' in this book are united by one fact: all of them endured long enough to issue their own stamps. Some of their names, such as Biafra or New Brunswick, will be relatively familiar. Others, such as Labuan, Tannu Tuva, and Inini, are far less recognizable. But all of these lost nations have stories to tell, whether they were as short-lived as Eastern Karelia, which lasted only a few weeks during the Soviet-Finnish War of 1922, or as long-lasting as the Orange Free State, a Boer Republic that celebrated fifty years as an independent state in the late 1800s. Their broad spectrum reflects the entire history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with its ideologies, imperialism, waves of immigration, and conflicts both major and minor. The motifs and symbols chosen for stamps have always served as a form of national self-presentation, an expression of the aims and ambitions of the ruling authorities. Drawing on fiction and eye-witness accounts as well as historical sources, Bjorn Berge's witty text casts an unconventional eye on these lesser-known nations. Nowherelands is a different kind of history book that will intrigue anyone keen to understand what makes a nation a nation.

Translated from the Norwegian.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Researcher and architect Berge treasures worn and cancelled stamps as proof of countries that existed but have disappeared. These "Nowherelands" may have become uninhabitable by disasters, been renamed after rebellions, or been carved into new territories after war. The existence of a stamp from the region is the evidence Berge required for a country's inclusion. Supplemental research is distilled into three- to five-page entries that typically feature a map, a quote, and writings that mention the territory. Stamp images are interspersed, though some are faded or heavily marked by cancellation ink. VERDICT An intriguing diversion for historians and travelers. © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.