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All the dirty parts : a novel / Daniel Handler.

By: Handler, Daniel.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, New York : Bloomsbury USA, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 134 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781632868046; 1632868040.Subject(s): High school students -- Fiction | Interpersonal relations -- Fiction | Dating (Social customs) -- FictionGenre/Form: Psychological fiction. | Romance fiction. | Erotic fiction.DDC classification: 813/.54 Summary: Cole is a boy in high school. He runs cross country, he sketches, he jokes around with friends. But none of this quite matters next to the allure of sex. "Let me put it this way," he says. "Draw a number line, with zero is you never think about sex and ten is, it's all you think about, and while you are drawing the line, I am thinking about sex." Cole fantasizes about whomever he's looking at. He consumes and shares pornography. And he sleeps with a lot of girls, which is beginning to earn him a not-quite-savory reputation around school. This leaves him adrift with only his best friend for company, and then something startling starts to happen between them that might be what he's been after all this time-and then he meets Grisaille.
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Fiction Davis (Central) Library
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Fiction Collection HAND 2 Checked out 28/09/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From bestselling, award-winning author Daniel Handler, a gutsy, exciting novel that looks honestly at the erotic impulses of an all-too-typical young man.
Cole is a boy in high school. He runs cross country, he sketches, he jokes around with friends. But none of this quite matters next to the allure of sex. "Let me put it this way," he says. "Draw a number line, with zero is you never think about sex and ten is, it's all you think about, and while you are drawing the line, I am thinking about sex."

Cole fantasizes about whomever he's looking at. He consumes and shares pornography. And he sleeps with a lot of girls, which is beginning to earn him a not-quite-savory reputation around school. This leaves him adrift with only his best friend for company, and then something startling starts to happen between them that might be what he's been after all this time and then he meets Grisaille.
All the Dirty Parts is an unblinking take on teenage desire in a culture of unrelenting explicitness and shunted communication, where sex feels like love, but no one knows what love feels like. With short chapters in the style of Jenny Offill or Mary Robison, Daniel Handler gives us a tender, brutal, funny, intoxicating portrait of an age when the lens of sex tilts the world. "There are love stories galore," Cole tells us, "This isn't that. The story I'm typing is all the dirty parts."

Cole is a boy in high school. He runs cross country, he sketches, he jokes around with friends. But none of this quite matters next to the allure of sex. "Let me put it this way," he says. "Draw a number line, with zero is you never think about sex and ten is, it's all you think about, and while you are drawing the line, I am thinking about sex." Cole fantasizes about whomever he's looking at. He consumes and shares pornography. And he sleeps with a lot of girls, which is beginning to earn him a not-quite-savory reputation around school. This leaves him adrift with only his best friend for company, and then something startling starts to happen between them that might be what he's been after all this time-and then he meets Grisaille.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

"There are love stories galore, and we all know them. This isn't that," 17-year-old Cole warns at the outset of his sex-obsessed confession, a millennial Portnoy's Complaint. "The story I'm typing is all the dirty parts." And how! In trying to capture the horny teenage mind, Handler (who has written for a younger audience as Lemony Snicket) wisely holds nothing back. Cole brags openly and in ribald detail about his sexual conquests, numbing any feeling of creeping loneliness through the instant gratification of online pornography. That he has gained a reputation around school doesn't seem to bother him, as he sleeps with a number of girls whose only function is to hone his sexual craft-and even experiments with his best friend Alec. It isn't until he meets Grisaille, an exchange student who is every bit his match, that Cole is forced to grapple with the emotional consequences of sex. Like David Levithan's The Lover's Dictionary, much of Handler's short novel takes place in the blank space between each episode, and it's in what the otherwise braggadocio Cole doesn't tell us that his story achieves its poignancy. Verdict Its unabashedly graphic language will keep this novel off of the young adult shelves, but it is exactly that readership who might benefit most from its surprisingly subtle exploration of sexual ethics.-Michael Pucci, South Orange P.L., NJ © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Teenage Cole is obsessed with sex. Not that he isn't having any. On the contrary, he's having a ton, but he still can't stop thinking about sweat, breasts, and porn. Aware of his rep at school but oblivious to how he's offending the girls around him, he's selfishly engrossed with his raw, urgent impulses and vividly describes his favorite, most erotic deeds. However, he starts developing a new code of sexual morals when he fools around with his best guy friend and dates Grisaille, a hairy hottie from Portugal who challenges his double standards and pursues sex with equal vigor. Though best known as kids' author Lemony Snicket, Handler continues his recent endeavor to boldly straddle the divide between teen and adult books, as he did in We Are Pirates (2015). Here, in brief, understated vignettes, Cole sounds like Holden Caulfield writing a sex blog. Amusing yet genuine, lustful yet sensitive, this odd novella approaches teenage horniness seriously and, in the process, touches on important subjects such as sexism, consent, and sexual identity. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Handler, aka Lemony Snicket, has an immense and loyal readership who will be eagerly awaiting this tale of teen sex and consciousness.--Hyzy, Biz Copyright 2017 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

A perpetually horny teenage boy learns the difference between a breakup and heartbreak.Puerile portrayals of aroused teenage boys are nothing new in any medium, from 1980s sex comedies like Porky's to novels like C.D. Payne's Youth in Revolt (1993). But this interesting experiment by Handler (We Are Pirates, 2015, etc.) may be the most cleareyed and honest portrayal of the sexuality of adolescent boys in recent memoryit's raw, authentic, fitfully funny, and tragic all at the same time. Our narrator is Cole, a high school student who's developed a well-earned reputation as a horndog in his school, as pointed out by his platonic frenemy, Kirsten: "I'm not talking about sex, Cole. I'm talking about how it's one girl, and then it's another." It may be true, but Cole is also consumed by the topic in the way teenage boys typically are, lost in a flood of yearning, online pornography, and blinding lust. During a dry spell, Cole even starts fooling around with his best friend and masturbating buddy, Alec, with unforeseen consequences. But halfway through the school year, Cole meets Grisaille, an exotic and dangerous exchange student who is every bit a match for Cole and more. "She could snap you in two, Cole," warns Kirsten. "She probably has, come to think of it." It's a slim volume, more stream-of-consciousness moments than true narration, but Handler has clearly put a lot of thought into what he's trying to teach here. His prose can be laser-focusedone of Cole's conquests is "crazy breathless Jesus Christ beautiful." Yet he can still disarm on the fly with surprising humor: "Four years ago, I think, I thought anal sex just meant you were really particular about it." A disarming cautionary tale that's just naughty enough to be kept from Handler's Lemony Snicket fans but real enough to spark genuine conversations about sex and its consequences. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.