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S.T.A.G.S. / M. A. Bennett.

By: Bennett, M. A, 1972-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Hot Key Books, 2017Description: 290 pages ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1471406768; 9781471406768.Other title: Stags.Subject(s): High school students -- Fiction | Bullying -- Fiction | Boarding schools -- Fiction | Survival -- Fiction | Hunting -- Fiction | Young adult fictionDDC classification: 823.92 Summary: It is the autumn term and Greer MacDonald is struggling to settle into the sixth form at the exclusive St. Aidan the Great boarding school, known to its privileged pupils as S.T.A.G.S. Just when she despairs of making friends Greer receives a mysterious invitation with three words embossed upon on it: huntin' shootin' fishin'. When Greer learns that the invitation is to spend the half term weekend at the country manor of Henry de Warlencourt, the most popular and wealthy boy at S.T.A.G.S., she is as surprised as she is flattered.But when Greer joins the other chosen few at the ancient and sprawling Longcross Hall, she realises that Henry's parents are not at home; the only adults present are a cohort of eerily compliant servants. The students are at the mercy of their capricious host, and, over the next three days, as the three bloodsports - hunting, shooting and fishing - become increasingly dark and twisted, Greer comes to the horrifying realisation that those being hunted are not wild game, but the very misfits Henry has brought with him from school.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Teenage Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Teenage Fiction
Teenage Fiction BENN Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Nine students. Three bloodsports. One deadly weekend. A twisting thriller for fans of gothic literature and The Hunger Games .

It is the autumn term and Greer MacDonald is struggling to settle into the sixth form at the exclusive St. Aidan the Great boarding school, known to its privileged pupils as S.T.A.G.S. Just when she despairs of making friends Greer receives a mysterious invitation with three words embossed upon on it: huntin' shootin' fishin'. When Greer learns that the invitation is to spend the half term weekend at the country manor of Henry de Warlencourt, the most popular and wealthy boy at S.T.A.G.S., she is as surprised as she is flattered.But when Greer joins the other chosen few at the ancient and sprawling Longcross Hall, she realises that Henry's parents are not at home; the only adults present are a cohort of eerily compliant servants. The students are at the mercy of their capricious host, and, over the next three days, as the three bloodsports - hunting, shooting and fishing - become increasingly dark and twisted, Greer comes to the horrifying realisation that those being hunted are not wild game, but the very misfits Henry has brought with him from school.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

I think I might be a murderer.   Although, as I didn't mean to kill, I suppose it was manslaughter, so technically I would be a "manslaughterer," although I don't think that's a word. When I got my scholarship to STAGS, my old headmistress told me, "You'll be the cleverest student in that school, Greer MacDonald." I might be; I might not. But I'm clever enough to know that "manslaughterer" is not a word.   I should make it clear here, before you lose all sympathy for me, that I didn't kill with my own hands. There were a few of us. I helped to cause a death, but not alone. I'm a murderer in the way that foxhunters are murderers--they are each responsible for the fox's death, even though they hunt in a pack. No one ever knows which dog tore the fox apart, but all the dogs, and all those riders in their smart red coats, are part of it.   I just gave myself away. Did you spot it? Those coats--the coats that posh people wear out foxhunting--they are pink, not red; hunting pink. And the dogs are not dogs; they are hounds.   Every time I open my mouth, I give myself away; Greer MacDonald, the Girl Who Doesn't Fit In. It's my northern accent, you see. I was born and raised in Manchester and went to Bewley Park Comprehensive School until this summer. In both those places I fitted in just fine. When I won my scholarship to STAGS, I stopped fitting in.   I ought to tell you a bit about STAGS, because I now realize how connected the school is to the murder. "STAGS" stands for "St. Aidan the Great School," and it is literally the oldest school in England. Not a single building in my comprehensive school, Bewley Park, was built before 1980. The earliest bit of STAGS, the chapel, was built back in 683, and it is covered in frescoes. Frescoes. Bewley Park was covered in graffiti.   STAGS was founded in the seventh century by the man himself. Saint Aidan the Great, I mean. Before the Church decided he was great, he was just a plain old monk, and he wandered around northern England telling anyone who would listen about Christianity. Then, presumably so he could stop wandering, he founded a school, where he told his pupils all about Christianity instead. You might assume that he was made a saint for all that telling people about Christianity, but apparently that's not how it works. In order to become a saint, you have to perform a miracle. Aidan's miracle was that he saved a stag from the hunt by turning him invisible. So the stag became Aidan's emblem, and the school's too. When I got my letter inviting me for an interview, the stag's antlers were the first thing I noticed, right at the top of the letter, like two little jagged black tears in the paper.   The first time I saw St. Aidan the Great School was when I went for my interview. It was one of those sunny midwinter days, all glittering frosty fields and long, low shadows. Dad drove me through the gates and up this long driveway through lush green grounds in his ten-year-old Mini Cooper. At the end of the drive, we got out and just stared and stared. We'd seen some pretty amazing scenery on the long trip from Yorkshire to Northumberland, but this was the best of all. It was a beautiful, vast medieval manor house, with a sort of moat and a little bridge to the entrance. It didn't look at all like the headquarters of a disturbing cult, which is what it actually is. The only clue, if I'd been looking for it, might have been the pair of antlers over the great door.   "Another Country," I said shakily.   Dad didn't nod, or murmur, You can say that again. He said, "If . . ."   My dad is a wildlife cameraman, and he loves films of all kinds, not just the nature documentaries that he mostly works on. We watch loads of films together, from obscure subtitled films to the stupidest brand-new blockbusters. I'm even named after Greer Garson, a film star from the black-and-white days. When Dad's traveling, or on night shoots, I watch films on my own, just to make up for the thirty-year head start he has on me. We have this game that we play; when something we see reminds us of a film, we say it out loud, and the other person has to name another film on the same theme. Now we were doing films featuring private schools. "And," he said, "Zéro de Conduite."   "Ooh la la," I said, "a French film. The gloves are off." I thought hard. "Harry Potter, films one to eight," I said, a bit shakily. "That's eight points."   Dad could obviously hear the nerves in my voice. He knows so many films that he could have beaten me easily, but he must have decided that today wasn't the day. "All right," he said, giving me his lopsided grin. "You win." He looked up at the grand entrance and the antlers over the door. "Let's get this over with."   And we did. I had the interview, I did the exam, I got in. And eight months later, at the beginning of autumn term, I was walking through the entrance of the school, under the antlers, as a sixth-form student. Excerpted from S.T.A.G.S by M. A. Bennett All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-St. Aidan the Great School (S.T.A.G.S.) students ignored their scholarship classmate Greer MacDonald throughout fall term. Until the "The Medievals," the school's dominant clique of anti-technology aristocratic kids, invite Greer and two other outcasts, "new money" Chanel and India-born Shafeen, for a traditional British countryside holiday. Cut off from the modern world, the stately manor of the group's kingpin, Henry de Warlencourt, enshrines an antiquated life of secret and sacred privileges. The weekend of hunting, shooting, and fishing starts awkwardly, becomes dangerous, and ends in blood. Narrator Katharine McEwan's voice cloaks listeners in chilling suspense as each dark moment unfolds. McEwan's Greer is an appropriate blend of apprehension and eagerness as she discovers the true nature of a grim tradition. McEwan subtly portrays the slight but telling vocal differences between the rigid British social classes. Though the characters' voices blur in the heat of the action, McEwan's timbre and tone perfectly match this monied private school thriller. VERDICT A well-chosen narrator animates the privileged and darkly mysterious world of British blue bloods gone murderous.-Elizabeth Nolan, San José Public Library, CA © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Like many prestigious boarding schools, St. Aiden the Great School (STAGS) runs on the reputation of its current and former students. Greer, a transfer scholarship student, isn't particularly wealthy or connected, so for the most part, she's ignored by the school's elite, a group of three boys and three girls termed the Medievals. So it's a surprise when she's invited to the estate of Henry de Warlencourt, their best and brightest. She's not alone two other students, both routinely bullied by the Medievals, have also been invited to a weekend of huntin' shootin' fishin'. But despite decadent food and luxurious accommodations, there's something off about the Medievals. As the weekend of sport begins, Greer begins to realize the Medievals' true quarry, and discovers just how deeply their ties to STAGS run. Quite a bit of plot is packed into the final third, but quick pacing and an undeniably intriguing hook make this British mystery a thoroughly compelling read, and the boarding-school setting has charms of its own. For thriller fans, it's a must.--Reagan, Maggie Copyright 2018 Booklist

Horn Book Review

Scholarship student Greer is initially awestruck by the rarified environment at her new boarding school, but she soon encounters malice beneath the gilded surface: a secret society is targeting outsiders deemed unworthy of the school, and Greer might be next. Painstaking pacing might lose some readers initially, but the increasingly menacing atmosphere builds up, and the payoff is worth it. (c) Copyright 2019. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.