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The red collar / Jean-Christophe Rufin ; translated from the French by Adriana Hunter.

By: Rufin, Jean-Christophe, 1952- [author.].
Contributor(s): Hunter, Adriana [translator.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookNew York, NY : Europa Editions, [2015] ©2015Description: 158 pages ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781609452735; 1609452739.Other title: What is loyalty? [Cover subtitle:].Uniform titles: Collier rouge. English. Subject(s): Loyalty -- Fiction | World War, 1914-1918 -- Fiction | Soldiers -- Fiction | Prisoners of war -- Fiction | Dogs -- Fiction | Berry (France) -- 20th century -- Fiction | France -- 20th century -- FictionGenre/Form: Historical fiction.DDC classification: 843/.914 Summary: In 1919, in a small town in the province of Berry, France, under the crushing heat of summer heat wave, a war hero is being held prisoner in an abandoned barracks. In front of the door to his prison, a mangy dog barks night and day. Miles from where he is being held, in the French countryside, a young extraordinarily intelligent woman works the land the land, waiting and hoping. A judge whose principles have been sorely shaken by the war is traveling to an unknown location to sort out certain affairs of which it is better not to speak.
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Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection RUFI 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In 1919, in a small town in the province of Berry, France, under the crushing heat of summer heat wave, a war hero is being held prisoner in an abandoned barracks. In front of the door to his prison, a mangy dog barks night and day. Miles from where he is being held, in the French countryside, a young extraordinarily intelligent woman works the land the land, waiting and hoping. A judge whose principles have been sorely shaken by the war is travelling to an unknown location to sort outcertain affairs of which it is better not to speak.

Three characters. In their midst, a dog who holds the key both to their destinies and to this intriguing plot.

Full of poetry and life, The Red Collar is at once a delightly simple narrative about the human spirit and a profound work about loyalty and love.

"A novel"--Cover.

Translation of: Le collier rouge.

In 1919, in a small town in the province of Berry, France, under the crushing heat of summer heat wave, a war hero is being held prisoner in an abandoned barracks. In front of the door to his prison, a mangy dog barks night and day. Miles from where he is being held, in the French countryside, a young extraordinarily intelligent woman works the land the land, waiting and hoping. A judge whose principles have been sorely shaken by the war is traveling to an unknown location to sort out certain affairs of which it is better not to speak.

Translated from French.

2 11 66

WWI

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

World War I has ended, yet a soldier named Morlac is locked up in an abandoned barracks in Berry, France, for committing "an outrage to the nation." In the awful summer heat, the dog that followed him to war and back howls relentlessly, faithful to the last. The military investigating officer wants Morlac to apologize and perhaps confess that he was drunk. But Morlac stands firm, and the officer must seek to understand him better, speaking to the mother of his child and finally recognizing the momentous role of pride in his actions. VERDICT A founder of Doctors Without Borders, Rufin has won the Prix Goncourt twice for his humane, absorbingly written novels. This brief, accessible work measures human values in perfectly balanced language. © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

A heroic veteran of World War I faces trial for a mysterious offense. The structure of Rufin's (The Dream Maker, 2013, etc.) novel of war and ideology is a meticulous and precise one, slowly bringing together a number of characters, each with his or her own ideals and quirks. At the center is Morlac, a young French soldier being held prisoner for an as-yet-unrevealed offense. Slowly, characters gather around him: the man who is investigating the case; Valentine, a young woman with a long history with Morlac; and the dog that stands near the prison, barking ceaselessly and frustrating those working there. Slowly, the story of Morlac's wartime activities emerges; slowly, too, the nature of his connections with Valentine and the dog. Rufin is at his best when evoking the complex blend of political convictions and ideologies that intermingled, sometimes violently, on the front lines. Morlac's own disillusionment and despair are also rendered powerfully. Rufin summons an abundance of drama not from a series of actions but from their aftermaths, and the question of how Morlac will deal with his future is one that haunts the novel. At times, the chamber setting adds an element of restraint to the proceedings: there are no real antagonists here, only characters struggling with their own actions and histories. But it's also a novel that abounds with sensory details, from the overwhelming heat to the claustrophobic interiors of the space where Morlac is held, creating a vivid impression of its setting. Rufin's novel is meticulous and orderly in its depictions of basically sympathetic characters trying to understand one another and find a common ground. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.