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Moonlight over Paris : a novel / Jennifer Robson.

By: Robson, Jennifer [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, NY : HarperLuxe, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2016Description: 431 pages ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780062442147; 0062442147.Subject(s): Nineteen twenties -- Fiction | Single women -- Fiction | Americans -- France -- Fiction | Self-actualization (Psychology) in women -- Fiction | Man-woman relationships -- Fiction | Paris (France) -- FictionGenre/Form: Romance fiction. | Canadian fiction. | Historical fiction. | Large type books.DDC classification: 813/.6 Summary: Spring, 1924. Recovering from a broken wartime engagement and a serious illness that left her near death, Lady Helena Montagu-Douglas-Parr vows that for once she will live life on her own terms. Breaking free from the stifling social constraints of the aristocratic society in which she was raised, she travels to France to stay with her free-spirited aunt. For one year, she will simply be Miss Parr. She will explore the picturesque streets of Paris, meet people who know nothing of her past, and pursue her dream of becoming an artist.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

An aristocratic young woman leaves the sheltered world of London to find adventure, passion, and independence in 1920s Paris in this mesmerizing story from the USA Today and internationally bestselling author of Somewhere in France and After the War is Over.

Spring, 1924

Recovering from a broken wartime engagement and a serious illness that left her near death, Lady Helena Montagu-Douglas-Parr vows that for once she will live life on her own terms. Breaking free from the stifling social constraints of the aristocratic society in which she was raised, she travels to France to stay with her free spirited aunt. For one year, she will simply be Miss Parr. She will explore the picturesque streets of Paris, meet people who know nothing of her past--and pursue her dream of becoming an artist.

A few years after the Great War's end, the City of Light is a bohemian paradise teeming with actors, painters, writers, and a lively coterie of American expatriates who welcome Helena into their romantic and exciting circle. Among them is Sam Howard, an irascible and infuriatingly honest correspondent for the Chicago Tribune. Dangerously attractive and deeply scarred by the horror and carnage of the war, Sam is unlike any man she has ever encountered. He calls her Ellie, sees her as no one has before, and offers her a glimpse of a future that is both irresistible and impossible.

As Paris rises phoenix-like from the ashes of the Great War, so too does Helena. Though she's shed her old self, she's still uncertain of what she will become and where she belongs. But is she strong enough to completely let go of the past and follow her heart, no matter where it leads her?

Artfully capturing the Lost Generation and their enchanting city, Moonlight Over Paris is the spellbinding story of one young woman's journey to find herself, and claim the life--and love--she truly wants.

Complete and unabridged.

Spring, 1924. Recovering from a broken wartime engagement and a serious illness that left her near death, Lady Helena Montagu-Douglas-Parr vows that for once she will live life on her own terms. Breaking free from the stifling social constraints of the aristocratic society in which she was raised, she travels to France to stay with her free-spirited aunt. For one year, she will simply be Miss Parr. She will explore the picturesque streets of Paris, meet people who know nothing of her past, and pursue her dream of becoming an artist.

5 11 19 20 105 115 147 164 165 172 175 183

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Robson's third novel focusing on the Great War and its aftermath (after Somewhere in France and After the War Is Over) shows how one woman breaks free of the bonds of aristocracy to find true happiness. After surviving a near-fatal illness, Lady Helena "Ellie" Montagu-Douglas-Parr is determined to live life to the fullest. While spending the summer with her Aunt Agnes in Antibes, Ellie meets journalist Sam Howard. Their mutual attraction deepens when they meet again in Paris, where Ellie enrolls in art school. Throughout her time in Paris, Ellie works diligently at her art as she studies under the demanding teacher, Maitre Czerny. Despite her misgivings about her abilities, Ellie is very happy practicing her craft, and she embraces the time she spends with her friends, a refreshing change from the stuffy drawing rooms of London. As her feelings for Sam grow stronger, she continues to wonder whether he feels the same way about her. Robson's historical research is evident in her great attention to detail, adding realism to a magnetic novel that's complete with actual historical figures. The blooming romance between Sam and Ellie is intensified by the magic of Paris in the 1920s, where new artists and musicians collaborated to create original masterpieces. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Kirkus Book Review

After recovering from a near-fatal illness, 28-year-old Lady Helena Montagu-Douglas-Parr of London decides it's time to move to Paris and start living life to its fullest. Historical fiction writer Robson (After the War Is Over, 2015, etc.) delivers a novel in which Lady Helena aims to break free of the aristocratic life in which she has become the focus of gossip and ostracism due to her broken engagement with an ill-suited World War l veteran. She successfully enrolls in a selective art school in Paris, where she will live with her free-spirited Aunt Agnes. With a one-year reprieve from her staid London existence, Helena promises herself she will transform her life, a venture made even more exciting given the backdrop of romantic Paris of the 1920s. Rather than the sizzling and multilayered story that early chapters hint will unfurl, the novel offers a linear account of a year in the life of a likable yet uninspiring protagonist who interacts with similarly benign and tepid characters. Helena's friends at art school all reveal potential complexity, yet none are explored or developed. Her love interest, Sam, an American journalist, is also a vague character sketch. Even Aunt Agnes, described as wildly avant-garde, ventures only as far as suggesting Helena take a lover. Also frustrating are the unsatisfying cameos by Lost Generation literary icons like Ernest Hemingway and Gertrude Stein. (Though the quick scene between the spatting F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald is fun.) These real-life characters are written into chapters as if to merely acknowledge their existence in the same time and place as Helena but serve no purpose to advance a slow-moving plot. Writing about a young art student restless for adventure in postwar Paris seems like a promising idea. Sadly, Robson delivers a dim tale devoid of moonlight. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.