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Long journey for sevenpence : an oral history of assisted immigration to New Zealand from the United Kingdom, 1947-1975 / Megan Hutching.

By: Hutching, Megan [author.].
Contributor(s): New Zealand. Department of Internal Affairs. Historical Branch.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington [N.Z.] : Victoria University Press in association with Historical Branch, Dept. of Internal Affairs, 1999Copyright date: ©1999Description: 208 pages : illustrations, facsimiles, portraits ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0864733607; 9780864733603.Subject(s): Assisted emigration | Immigrants -- New Zealand -- Attitudes | British -- New Zealand -- Attitudes | Immigrants -- New Zealand -- Biography | New Zealand -- Emigration and immigration -- History -- 20th century | New Zealand -- Emigration and immigration -- Government policy | New Zealand -- Emigration and immigration -- Social aspects | Great Britain -- Emigration and immigration -- History -- 20th century | New Zealand -- Emigration and immigration -- HistoryDDC classification: 325.2410993 Summary: ""Long journey for sevenpence" is the story of the 77,000 men, women and children who came to New Zealand from Britain as part of the New Zealand government's assisted immigration scheme between 1947 and 1975. Using interviews and questionnaires, Megan Hutching has created a lively account of the process of emigration from the point of view of the immigrants themselves, often in their own words. She recounts their experiences of the 12,000 mile sea journey to New Zealand and adaptation to life in a new country -- a new landscape, a new climate, new social and and cultural worlds. Not all agree it was the best thing they ever did, but most of them remained and consider themselves New Zealanders. Why did people in post war Britain want to make the long journey to the other side of the world? Besides answers to this question, in this generously illustrated history Hutching also explores New Zealand government policy and the reasons for the introduction of the assisted immigration scheme in 1947." -- Back cover.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Heritage & Archives Alexander Library | Te Rerenga Mai o Te Kauru
Heritage Collections
Heritage Collections (Glassroom) 325.241 HUT 1 Reference Only
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 325.241 HUT 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Using interviews and questionaires, Megan Hutching has created a lively account of the process of emigration from the point of view of the migrants themselves, often in their own words. She recounts their experiences of the 12,000-mile sea journey to New Zealand and adaption to a life in a new country. Not all agree that it was the best thing they ever did, but most of them remained and now consider themselves New Zealanders. Why did people in post-war Britain make the long journey to the other side of the world? Besides the answers to this question, in this generously illustrated history Hutching also explores New Zealand government policy and the reasons for the assistend immigration scheme in 1947.

Includes bibliographic references (pages 186-206) and index.

""Long journey for sevenpence" is the story of the 77,000 men, women and children who came to New Zealand from Britain as part of the New Zealand government's assisted immigration scheme between 1947 and 1975. Using interviews and questionnaires, Megan Hutching has created a lively account of the process of emigration from the point of view of the immigrants themselves, often in their own words. She recounts their experiences of the 12,000 mile sea journey to New Zealand and adaptation to life in a new country -- a new landscape, a new climate, new social and and cultural worlds. Not all agree it was the best thing they ever did, but most of them remained and consider themselves New Zealanders. Why did people in post war Britain want to make the long journey to the other side of the world? Besides answers to this question, in this generously illustrated history Hutching also explores New Zealand government policy and the reasons for the introduction of the assisted immigration scheme in 1947." -- Back cover.

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