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Crimson shore / Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child.

By: Preston, Douglas J [author.].
Contributor(s): Child, Lincoln [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Preston, Douglas J. Pendergast: 15.Publisher: New York : Grand Central Publishing, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Edition: First Edition.Description: 339 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781455525928.Subject(s): Pendergast, Aloysius (Fictitious character) -- Fiction | Government investigators -- Fiction | Murder -- Investigation -- Fiction | Massachusetts -- FictionGenre/Form: Thrillers (Fiction) DDC classification: 813/.54 Summary: "A seemingly straightforward private case turns out to be much more complicated--and sinister--than Special Agent A.X.L. Pendergast ever could have anticipated. Pendergast, together with his ward Constance Greene, travels to the quaint seaside village of Exmouth, Massachusetts, to investigate the theft of a priceless wine collection. But inside the wine cellar, they find something considerably more disturbing: a bricked-up niche that once held a crumbling skeleton."--Book jacket.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection PRE 1 Available T00591458
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

When a straightforward murder case spirals out of control, Pendergast and his ward investigate an ancient witches' colony in a sleepy New England town where a terrible evil awaits . . . <br> A secret chamber.<br> A mysterious shipwreck.<br> A murder in the desolate salt marshes. <br> <br> A seemingly straightforward private case turns out to be much more complicated-and sinister-than Special Agent A.X.L. Pendergast ever could have anticipated.<br> Pendergast, together with his ward Constance Greene, travels to the quaint seaside village of Exmouth, Massachusetts, to investigate the theft of a priceless wine collection. But inside the wine cellar, they find something considerably more disturbing: a bricked-up niche that once held a crumbling skeleton.<br> <br> Pendergast and Constance soon learn that Exmouth is a town with a very dark and troubled history, and this skeleton may be only the first hint of an ancient transgression, kept secret all these years. But they will discover that the sins of the past are still very much alive. Local legend holds that during the 1692 witch trials in Salem, the real witches escaped, fleeing north to Exmouth and settling deep in the surrounding salt marshes, where they continued to practice their wicked arts. Then, a murdered corpse turns up in the marshes. The only clue is a series of mysterious carvings. Could these demonic symbols bear some relation to the ancient witches' colony, long believed to be abandoned?<br> <br> A terrible evil lurks beneath the surface of this sleepy seaside town-one with deep roots in Exmouth's grim history. And it may be that Constance, with her own troubled past, is the only one who truly comprehends the awful danger that she, Pendergast, and the residents of Exmouth must face . . . <br> <br>

Map on endpapers.

"A seemingly straightforward private case turns out to be much more complicated--and sinister--than Special Agent A.X.L. Pendergast ever could have anticipated. Pendergast, together with his ward Constance Greene, travels to the quaint seaside village of Exmouth, Massachusetts, to investigate the theft of a priceless wine collection. But inside the wine cellar, they find something considerably more disturbing: a bricked-up niche that once held a crumbling skeleton."--Book jacket.

Kotui multi-version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

The 15th fantastic adventure of eccentric, brilliant Special FBI agent Aloysius Pendergast finds him and Constance Greene, his lovely young ward, leaving their Manhattan mansion for Exmouth, Mass., on a case unrelated to the agency-the theft of a wine cellar. This basic bit of sleuthing leads to much more: a corpse in a hidden chamber, additional murders, a colony of witches, and an unstoppable, homicidal creature that is thought to exist only in local lore. Over the years, Auberjonois has developed the perfect voice for Pendergast-seasoned, aristocratic, Southern, and, when dealing with a bully like Exmouth's police chief, irritatingly arrogant. Auberjonois's version of Constance, who is having difficulty hiding her desire for her older mentor (and he for her), is acceptable, but if the authors continue to expand her participation in these thrillers, a younger, female co-reader may be advisable. A Grand Central hardcover. (Nov.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

FBI special agent Aloysius Pendergast doesn't often take on private cases, but he makes an exception for a man whose pricey wine collection has been stolen from his home in a small seaside Massachusetts town. Pendergast and his ward, Constance Greene, soon figure out that the wine theft was merely a cover-up for an entirely different crime: a skeleton, concealed for more than a century behind the basement walls of the old house, has been stolen. Soon there is a murder, followed by another, and everything seems connected not only to the disappearance of a sailing vessel in the late 1800s but also to survivors of the Salem witch hunts. The Pendergast novels combine elegant prose with sharp-witted storytelling, and the FBI agent continues to be one of thrillerdom's more engaging characters. A worthy entry in the long-running series.--Pitt, David Copyright 2016 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Amid the salt marshes near Exmouth, Massachusetts, FBI Special Agent Aloysius Pendergast finds an antique medallion of Morax, a demon. Is there a connection to the deliberate sinking of the cargo ship Pembroke Castle by desperate town folk in 1884? In Preston and Child's (Blue Labyrinth, 2014, etc.) latest, renowned sculptor Percival Lake asks the weird and wily Pendergast to find his looted wine collection. Oddly, the thieves left behind a case of the rarest vintage, Chateau Haut-Braquilanges '04. Intrigued, Pendergast and his ward, Constance, drive to seaside Exmouth, where they meet an incompetent police chief who's overlooked a skeleton long ago walled up in Lake's wine cellar. Pendergast discovers the hidden skeleton is linked to a missing suite of flawless rubies, the Pride of Africa. In the "lean winter" of 1883-84, featuring disastrous weather caused by a faraway volcanic eruption, townspeople doused the lighthouse and lured Pembroke Castle, carrying the rubies, aground. The grounding and what followed became an atrocity shadowing Exmouth history. Oenophiles will shudder as the wine theft turns sideshow after a historian tracing the shipwreck and a local attorney are killed. Both have "TYBANE" carved into their corpses. Those new to the series get no back story on Pendergast, not on FBI assignment in this case, or Constance, but the book is entertaining, spiced up with arcane words like "desuetude" and quirky descriptionsa body found with a crab "cowering in the comb-over." Employing Chongg Ran meditation and a Les Baer .45, Pendergast is an appealingly quirky hero, as when he remarks of Moby-Dick, "I, myself, am not fond of animal stories." Pendergast is a modern Sherlock Holmes, albeit one preferring absinthe to cocaine. The conclusion of this compelling two-prong mystery assures another crime conundrum is sure to wash ashore. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.