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The Anzacs / Patsy Adam-Smith.

By: Adam-Smith, Patsy.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Camberwell, Vic. : Penguin, 2011, c1978Description: xii, 492 pages ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780140165395 (pbk); 0140165398 (pbk).Subject(s): Great Britain. Army. Australian and New Zealand Army Corps | World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, Australian | World War, 1914-1918 -- CampaignsDDC classification: 940.48194 Summary: "Gallipoli was the final resting place for thousands of young Australians. Death struck so fast there was not time for escape or burial. And when Gallipoli was over there was the misery of the European Campaign. Patsy Adam-Smith read over 8000 diaries and letters to write her acclaimed best-seller about the First World War. Soldiers sought her out to tell her why they went, what they saw, and how they felt about that great holocaust. Their simple accounts are more vivid than any novel; the years have not dimmed their memories of lost comrades and the horrors of war. These are the extraordinary experiences of ordinary men {u2013} and they strike to the heart."--Publisher description.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

'If you have not read The Anzacs there will always be a part of Australia you will never understand.' Les Carlyon, The Australian Gallipoli was the final resting place for thousands of young Australians. Death struck so fast there was not time for escape or burial. And when Gallipoli was over there was the misery of the European Campaign. Patsy Adam-Smith read over 8000 diaries and letters to write her acclaimed best-seller about the First World War. Soldiers sought her out to tell her why they went, what they saw, and how they felt about that great holocaust. Their simple accounts are more vivid than any novel; the years have not dimmed their memories of lost comrades and the horrors of war. These are the extraordinary experiences of ordinary men - and they strike to the heart. Winner of the Age Book of the Year award when first published in 1978, The Anzacs remains unrivalled as the classic account of Australia's involvement in the First World War.

Subtitle on cover: The classic account of the men who gave birth to a legend.

First published: Thomas Nelson Australia, 1978.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 477-483) and index.

"Gallipoli was the final resting place for thousands of young Australians. Death struck so fast there was not time for escape or burial. And when Gallipoli was over there was the misery of the European Campaign. Patsy Adam-Smith read over 8000 diaries and letters to write her acclaimed best-seller about the First World War. Soldiers sought her out to tell her why they went, what they saw, and how they felt about that great holocaust. Their simple accounts are more vivid than any novel; the years have not dimmed their memories of lost comrades and the horrors of war. These are the extraordinary experiences of ordinary men {u2013} and they strike to the heart."--Publisher description.

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